Letters to Milena

Letters to Milena PDF ¶ Letters to  PDF/EPUB ²
  • Paperback
  • 298
  • Letters to Milena
  • Franz Kafka
  • English
  • 10 February 2019
  • 0805208852

About the Author: Franz Kafka

Letters to Milena PDF ¶ Letters to PDF/EPUB ² letters download, milena kindle, Letters to free, Letters to MilenaLetters to Milena PDFFranz Kafka was one of the major fiction writers of the th century He was born to a middle class German speaking Jewish family in Prague, Bohemia presently the Czech Republic , Austria Hungary His unique body of writing much of which is incomplete and which was mainly published posthumously is considered to be among the most influential in Western literatureHis stories include The Metamorphosis and In the Penal Colony , while his novels are The Trial , The Castle and Amerika Kafka s first language was German, but he was Letters to PDF/EPUB ² also fluent in Czech Later, Kafka acquired some knowledge of the French language and culture one of his favorite authors was FlaubertKafka first studied chemistry at the Charles Ferdinand University of Prague, but switched after two weeks to law This offered a range of career possibilities, which pleased his father, and required a longer course of study that gave Kafka time to take classes in German studies and art history At the university, he joined a student club, named Lese und Redehalle der Deutschen Studenten, which organized literary events, readings and other activities In the end of his first year of studies, he met Max Brod, who would become a close friend of his throughout his life, together with the journalist Felix Weltsch, who also studied law Kafka obtained the degree of Doctor of Law on June and performed an obligatory year of unpaid service as law clerk for the civil and criminal courtsKafka s writing attracted little attention until after his death During his lifetime, he published only a few short stories and never finished any of his novels, unless The Metamorphosis is considered a short novel Prior to his death, Kafka wrote to his friend and literary executor Max Brod Dearest Max, my last request Everything I leave behind me in the way of diaries, manuscripts, letters my own and others , sketches, and so on, is to be burned unread Brod overrode Kafka s wishes, believing that Kafka had given these directions to him specifically because Kafka knew he would not honor them Brod had told him as much Brod, in fact, would oversee the publication of most of Kafka s work in his possession, which soon began to attract attention and high critical regardMax Brod encountered significant difficulty in compiling Kafka s notebooks into any chronological order as Kafka was known to start writing in the middle of notebooks, from the last towards the first, etcAll of Kafka s published works, except several letters he wrote in Czech to Milena Jesensk , were written in German.


Letters to MilenaLetters to Milena PDF ¶ Letters to PDF/EPUB ² letters download, milena kindle, Letters to free, Letters to MilenaLetters to Milena PDFIn no other work does Kafka reveal himself as in the Letters to Milena, which begin essentially as a business correspondence but soon develop into a passionate letter love Milena Jesensk was a gifted and charismatic woman of twenty three Kafka s Czech translator, she was uniquely able to recognize his complex genius and his even complex character For the thirty six year old Kafka, she was a living fire, such as I have never seen It was to her that he revealed his most intimate self It was to her that, after the end Letters to PDF/EPUB ² of the affair, he entrusted the safekeeping of his diariesNewly translated, revised, and expanded, this edition contains material previously omitted because of its extreme sensitivity Also included for the first time are letters and essays by Milena Jesensk , herself a talented writer as well as the recipient of these documents of Kafka s love, anxiety, and despair.

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10 thoughts on “Letters to Milena

  1. Ilse says:

    An anthology of longing Because I love you you see, I do love you, you dimwit, my love engulfs you the way the sea loves a tiny pebble on its bed and may I be the pebble with you, heaven permitting I love the whole world and that includes your left shoulder no, the right one was first and so I ll kiss it whenever I want to and whenever you re kind enough to pull down your blouse a little and that also includes your left shoulder and your face above me in the forest and your face below me i An anthology of longing Because I love you you see, I do love you, you dimwit, my love engulfs you the way the sea loves a tiny pebble on its bed and may I be the pebble with you, heaven permitting I love the whole world and that includes your left shoulder no, the right one was first and so I ll kiss it whenever I want to and whenever you re kind enough to pull down your blouse a little and that also includes your left shoulder and your face above me in the forest and your face below me in the forest and my resting on your almost naked breast And that s why you re right in saying we were already one and I m not afraid of this on the contrary, it is my only happiness and my only pride and I don t at all restrict it to the forest. Josef Sudek When Milena Jesensk , a Czech journalist and writer asked Franz Kafka for permission to translate his short story The Stoker later published as the first chapter of Amerika into Czech, she would not just become Kafka s first translator, but also the addressee of a flood of enthralling and increasingly passionate letters 149 letters and postcards, 140 written during 10 months, sometimes several times a day, from March to December 1920, the last ones between 1921 and 1923, a few months before Kafka s death from TB on 24th June 1924 Kafka s letters, entrusted by Milena to Willy Haas, a common acquaintance, subsisted, unlike Milena s letters to Kafka, which are presumed lost Soon the correspondence alters into an consuming epistolary relationship when it deepens from a sharing of a profound mutual empathy Her poverty The unfaithfulness of her husband Her loneliness His fear His illness His fianc e , into a mutual baring of the soul and a long distance intimacy which brings Kafka despair, torment, bliss, sleeplessness as well as uttermost happinessIn their entirety as well as in almost every line, your letters are the most beautiful thing that ever happened to meAlain Fleischer, Franz II Homage to Kafka Writing one another several times a day, he most of the time in German, she in Czech, the criss crossing of letters brought Kafka, exhausted by his illness and insomnia, on the verge of collapse Torn by the constant trepidation brought by her letters, he asked her to stop writing while at the same time begging for her letters Yesterday I advised you not to write me every day, I still hold the same opinion today and it would be very good for both of us, and so I repeat my advice today evenemphatically only please, Milena, don t listen to me, and write me every day anyway, it can even be very brief, briefer than today s letters, just 2 lines, just one, just one word, but if I had to go without them I would suffer terribly. July 20, 1920.Both fascinated by and recoiling from Milena s blistering personality and vivacity, Kafka writes to Max Brod his insomnia becoming unbearable because of his correspondence with hershe is a living fire, of a kind I have never seen before. According to Brod s Franz Kafka A Biography, Kafka held Milena in high esteem as a writer, comparing her psychological meditations and reportages on life in Vienna, books, fashion, meditations to the letters and travelogues of Theodor Fontane observing the deplorable state of Kafka waiting in the office for a letter of Milena to arrive, terribly exalted, undermining his already weak health, he visits Kafka at the office to help him get through the long hours waiting for another letter or telegram of MilenaBut whenever these other letters come, Milena, even if they are basicallyauspicious than the first ones although on account of my weakness it takes me days to penetrate to their happiness these letters which begin with exclamations and after all, I am so far away , and which end with I don t know what terrible things, then, Milena, I literally start to shake as if under an alarm bell I am unable to read them and naturally I read them anyway, the way an animal dying of thirst drinks, and with that comes fear andfear I look for a piece of furniture to crawl under trembling, totally unaware of the world, I pray you might fly back out of the window the way you came storming in inside your letter After all, I can t keep a storm in my room..And so we get swept away in a gruelling, paradoxical dance of push pull relationship dynamics and inertia, a continuous veering between detachment and attachment, a relationship simultaneously intensifying and alienating partly because of the distance Often packed in one letter, we find tender expressions of the desire to bridge the distance in a scorching longing for closenessI am so happy to breathe again with you so near It is impossible to understand how my breast could expand and contract enough to breathe this air, it s impossible to understand how you can be far away I kept wanting to hear a different sentence than you did, this one you re mine And why that one in particular It doesn t even mean love, just nearness and nightand distorted evading of the threat of bodily presence by pushing away and disheartening the woman haunting him and depriving him of his sleepIf you become involved with me, you will be throwing yourself into the abyss We see Kafka hiding behind his fear, his illness, his work, his demons in order not to meet Milena, Milena pressing him to meet, until eventually the relationship agrounds in despondency, and they must face there will not be a common future, never During the frantic phase of exchanging letters, Kafka and Milena met in person only twice, four days in Vienna in June 1920, and one day in Gm nd, on the Austrian Czech border, in August 1920 As the relationship proved without prospect, Milena not willing to leave her husband to come to live with Kafka in Prague, Kafka broke off the relationship, the letters continuing, less frequent, againformal in tone, the time following While Kafka later, on December 2, 1921 will write in his diary Always Milena, or maybe not Milena, but a principle, a light in the darkness ,darkness and despair creep into the lettersI don t believe the funny letters any I almost said I don t believe any letters any, even the most beautiful ones always contain a worm September 4, 1920 No one sings as purely as those who inhabit the deepest hell what we take to be the song of angels is their song August 26, 1920 It s unfair to laugh at the lead singer in the opera who sings an aria while lying on the stage, mortally wounded We lie on the ground and sing for years September 1920 Numerous passages recount on Kafka s notorious fear , a fear like a living animal caging Kafka, ranging far beyond the well known fear of intimacy, commitment and being tied down A fear that, as well as Milena s marriage to Ernst Pollak, will at last come between themPerhaps the logical conclusion is that we re both married, you in Vienna, I to my fear in Prague July 21, 1920From these letters Kafka emerges not solely as an anxious and restless insomniac man on the edge, but as well as a witty, loving and playful human being bestowing his epistolary companion with endearing tenderness and affection, showing concern about her weal and woe, her health, her friendships, her like his equally difficult relationship with her father, her work, while at the same time exploring his own murky depths, ensuing in an enigmatic amalgamation of transparency and obfuscation, a blending of self disclosure of his psyche as well as a delirious evocation of a ghostly inner world of delusionsMoreover, perhaps it isn t love when I say you are what I love the most you are the knife I turn inside myself, this is love The easy possibility of writing letters from a purely theoretical point of view must have brought wrack and ruin to the souls of the world Writing letters is actually an intercourse with ghosts and by no means just with the ghost of the addressee but also with one s own ghost, which secretly evolves inside the letter one is writing or even in a whole series of letters, where one letter corroborates another and can refer to it as witness How did people ever get the idea they could communicate with one another by letter One can think about someone far away and one can hold on to someone nearby everything else is beyond human power Writing letters, on the other hand, means exposing oneself to the ghosts, who are greedily waiting precisely for that Written kisses never arrive at their destination the ghosts drink them up along the way It is this ample nourishment which enables them to multiply so enormously People sense this and struggle against it in order to eliminate as much of the ghosts power as possible and to attain a natural intercourse, a tranquility of soul, they have invented trains, cars, aeroplanes but nothing helps any These are evidently inventions devised at the moment of crashing The opposing side is so much calmer and stronger after the postal system, the ghosts invented the telegraph, the telephone, the wireless They will not starve, but we will perishWhile apparently revealing in many respects, the letters mostly left me onlymystified on Kafka s personality for which the epithet convoluted maybe would be an understatement if a Freudian reading of the Letters to Milena would take your fancy, try Kafka s Letters to Milena and the Question of the Body by Shadi Neimneh As I read both The trial and The Castle aeons ago, the connections between these intimate musings and his fictional work like Felice Bauer is, according to Elias Canetti, central to the plot of The Trial, Milena and her husband Ernst Pollak will appear in The Castle remain for me features still to explore, maybe in a next life.Reading this was an overwhelming experience Bemused by their fulgurant intensity, I couldn t read this ardent and often painful letters but slowly, in spells, lost in the brilliant beauty of the sentences, their unexpected lyricism and tenderness, the sensuous and horrifying poetry of certain fragmentsAnd now my best regards after all what does it matter if they collapse at your garden gate perhaps your strength will be all the greaterOn Christmas Day 1923, half a year before his death Kafka ended his correspondence to Milena with these last words Arrested by the Gestapo for active resistance to Nazi occupation, Milena Jesensk died in Ravensbr ck on 17th May 1944, 47 years old

  2. Mutasim Billah says:

    When one is alone, imperfection must be endured every minute of the day a couple, however, does not have to put up with it Aren t our eyes made to be torn out, and our hearts for the same purpose At the same time it s really not that bad that s an exaggeration and a lie, everything is exaggeration, the only truth is longing But even the truth of longing is not so much its own truth it s really an expression for everything else, which is a lie This sounds crazy and distorted, but it s When one is alone, imperfection must be endured every minute of the day a couple, however, does not have to put up with it Aren t our eyes made to be torn out, and our hearts for the same purpose At the same time it s really not that bad that s an exaggeration and a lie, everything is exaggeration, the only truth is longing But even the truth of longing is not so much its own truth it s really an expression for everything else, which is a lie This sounds crazy and distorted, but it s true Moreover, perhaps it isn t love when I say you are what I love the most you are the knife I turn inside myself, this is love This, my dear, is loveMilena Jesensk was born in Prague, Austria Hungary In 1918 she married Ernst Pollak, a Jewish intellectual and literary critic whom she met in Prague s literary circles, and moved with him to Vienna The marriage, which allegedly caused her to break off relations with her father for several years, was an unhappy one In 1919 she discovered a short story The Stoker by Prague writer Franz Kafka, and wrote him to ask for permission to translate it from German to Czech The letter launched an intense and increasingly passionate correspondence Jesensk and Kafka met twice they spent four days in Vienna together and later a day in Gm nd Eventually Kafka broke off the relationship, partly because Jesensk was unable to leave her husband, and their almost daily communication ceased abruptly in November 1920 They meant so much to each other, however, that they did exchange a fewletters in 1922 and 1923 and Kafka turned over to Jesensk his diaries at the end of his life Jesensk s translation of The Stoker was a first translation of Kafka s writings into Czech and as a matter of fact, into any foreign language later she translated two other short stories by Kafka and also texts by Hermann Broch, Franz Werfel, Upton Sinclair, and many others Jaroslav Dohal, the name given for the translator of the Czech edition of Kafka s short story Reflections for Gentlemen Jockeys , is most likely a pseudonym for JesenskThe easy possibility of writing letters must have brought wrack and ruin to the souls of the world Writing letters is actually an intercourse with ghosts, and by no means just the ghost of the addressee but also with one s own ghost, which secretly evolves inside the letter one is writingThe words in these letters are a haunting testament of longing and agony The intense emotions that produced the ghostly poetry of Kafka s words are well documented here This particular edition of Letters to Milena contains material previously omitted because of its extreme sensitivity Also among the extended contents are Milena Jesensk s Letters to Max Brod Four Essays by Milena Jesensk Vienna , Letters of Notable People , A Dream , and The Devil at the Hearth Milena Jesensk s Obituary for Franz KafkaKafka died of laryngeal tuberculosis on 3 June 1924, aged 40, in a sanatorium in Kierling just outside Vienna.Arrested by the Gestapo for active resistance to Nazi occupation, Milena Jesensk died in Ravensbr ck on 17th May 1944, 47 years old

  3. Tara says:

    Sometimes I feel we have a room with two doors on opposite sides and each of us is holding his doorknob and, at the bat of one person s eyelash, the other jumps behind his door, and now if the first person utters a single word, the second is sure to close the door behind him, so that he can no longer be seen He is bound to reopen the door, though, since it may be a room impossible to leave If only the first person weren t exactly like the second, then he would be calm and pretend not to caSometimes I feel we have a room with two doors on opposite sides and each of us is holding his doorknob and, at the bat of one person s eyelash, the other jumps behind his door, and now if the first person utters a single word, the second is sure to close the door behind him, so that he can no longer be seen He is bound to reopen the door, though, since it may be a room impossible to leave If only the first person weren t exactly like the second, then he would be calm and pretend not to care in the slightest about the second he would slowly go about ordering this room the way he would any other But instead, he repeats the same thing at his door occasionally even both people are standing behind their doors at the same time and the beautiful room is emptyThis incredibly intimate collection of letters revealed a great deal of Kafka s personal life, undoubtedly farthan he d have been comfortable sharing with the public at large Readers vividly experience not only his vast, seemingly boundless love for Milena, but also his excruciating longing, overwhelming self doubt and anxiety, and the rather dilapidated state of his physical health While Kafka s insightful observations and wry sense of humor certainly resonated with me, what really blew me away was his wonderful, almost naively excessive honesty He was extremely sensitive and perceptive, and he related all he saw with endearing sincerity Milena herself wrote about this trait of his quite eloquentlyObviously, we are all capable of living, because at one time or another we have all taken refuge in a lie, in blindness, enthusiasm, optimism, a conviction, pessimism, or something else But Kafka has never fled to any refuge, not one He is absolutely incapable of lying, just as he is incapable of getting drunk He lacks even the smallest refuge he has no shelter That is why he is exposed to everything we are protected from He is like a naked man among the dressedHe let everything in and experienced it all fully, almost like a child does This is a rare and precious trait, and though at times it left him vulnerable to intense, agonizing pain, it was also why he possessed such formidable insight, intelligence, and humor Kafka s soul was in many ways far too pure for this fucked up world.Due to this remarkable clarity of vision, many of the musings and reflections scattered throughout these letters were absolutely fascinating For instance, when discussing how neuroses can function as a form of mental crutches, his observation that it s no sign of recovery when the crutches grow to be a burden was profound not only due to its keen psychological awareness, but also because of how relentlessly he was tormented by this phenomenon himself No stranger to masochism, Kafka s description of his love for Milena struck a chord with me tooMoreover, perhaps it isn t love when I say you are what I love the most you are the knife I turn inside myself, this is loveAlong these same lines, he made the excellent point that genuinely longing for someone can be searing enough on its own without having to resort to any melodramatic flourishes or hyperboleAren t our eyes made to be torn out, and our hearts for the same purpose At the same time it s really not that bad that s an exaggeration and a lie, everything is exaggeration, the only truth is longing, which cannot be exaggeratedVery true.He also expressed some truly compelling thoughts regarding the nature of letter writing itselfWriting letters is actually an intercourse with ghosts and by no means just with the ghost of the addressee but also with one s own ghost, which secretly evolves inside the letter one is writing or even in a whole series of letters How did people ever get the idea they could communicate with one another by letterSo beautifully put But then Kafka, even in his personal correspondence, and though he despaired of being able to successfully communicate through such a medium, simply wasn t capable of writing with anything less than this type of evocative brilliance..As always, spending time in Kafka s head was strange and wondrous, though at times, I have to admit, I felt cramped, even claustrophobic Reading these letters, you are surrounded by his love, warmth, and heartfelt honesty, but no less by his insecurities, neuroses, anguish, and fear Still, after all s said and done, I really can t think of many other heads I d care to inhabit

  4. Buck says:

    Truth be told, I m not currently reading anything except hockey boxscores and those breezy MSN articles with titles like Eight Signs She s Into You what can I say I eat that shit up Anyway, it s probably not a good idea to read about a twisted, anguished, tragically thwarted love affair when one s own romantic life is unsatisfactory Still, skimming through Kafka s weird, eloquent Letters to Milena got me thinking how come nobody writes love letters any Flirty emails, yes bitter, Truth be told, I m not currently reading anything except hockey boxscores and those breezy MSN articles with titles like Eight Signs She s Into You what can I say I eat that shit up Anyway, it s probably not a good idea to read about a twisted, anguished, tragically thwarted love affair when one s own romantic life is unsatisfactory Still, skimming through Kafka s weird, eloquent Letters to Milena got me thinking how come nobody writes love letters any Flirty emails, yes bitter, rambling post breakup letters sure, who hasn t written a few But an honest to goodness, balls out, you complete me sort of love letter who does that I m not the most romantic guy in the world, but I find it a little sad to think that we ll probably never see another book like this, because if there s a modern day Kafka out there somewhere, he s busy jabbing r u horny 2 into his keypad There s something to be said for concision, I guess

  5. E. G. says:

    Introduction, by Philip BoehmA Note on the Text Letters to Milena Appendices Milena Jesensk s Letters to Max BrodFour Essays by Milena Jesensk Vienna , Letters of Notable People , A Dream , and The Devil at the Hearth Milena Jesensk s Obituary for Franz KafkaNotes

  6. metaphor says:

    With my teeth clenched, however, and with your eyes before me I can endure anything distance, anxiety, worry, letterlessnes With you in my heart I can bear everything, and even if I did write that the days without letters were horrifying, it s not true they were just horribly difficult the boat was heavy and it s draught was horribly deep, but on your tide it floated nonetheless There s only one thing I cannot bear without your express help, Milena the fear I m much too weak for th With my teeth clenched, however, and with your eyes before me I can endure anything distance, anxiety, worry, letterlessnes With you in my heart I can bear everything, and even if I did write that the days without letters were horrifying, it s not true they were just horribly difficult the boat was heavy and it s draught was horribly deep, but on your tide it floated nonetheless There s only one thing I cannot bear without your express help, Milena the fear I m much too weak for that, it s so immense I cannot see beyond it and this monstrous flood is washing me away I am constantly trying to communicate something incommunicable, to explain something inexplicable, to tell about something I only feel in my bones and which can only be experienced in those bones Basically it is nothing other than this fear we have so often talked about, but fear spread to everything, fear of the greatest as of the smallest, fear, paralyzing fear of pronouncing a word, although this fear may not only be fear but also a longing for something greater than all that is fearful

  7. Tanya says:

    Dear Franz,I hope you ve finally found contentment wherever you are unlike when you were in this appalling world It rather astounds me to read your letters to your love, Milena because they are the most private correspondence possible that I almost feel ashamed of having read them now It s as if getting to know a man beyond his grave so I felt morally bankrupt when I was done The vulnerability with which you describe your feelings towards an obscure lover is not something that s seeking empat Dear Franz,I hope you ve finally found contentment wherever you are unlike when you were in this appalling world It rather astounds me to read your letters to your love, Milena because they are the most private correspondence possible that I almost feel ashamed of having read them now It s as if getting to know a man beyond his grave so I felt morally bankrupt when I was done The vulnerability with which you describe your feelings towards an obscure lover is not something that s seeking empathetic eyes, but schlepping the preeminent essence of what we all possess Insecurities.Oh, how valiantly you wear them, communicate them with utmost diligence and sincerity, I couldn t help but fall in love at an instant I had my first encounter with you when I accidentally stumbled upon one of your short stories, In The Penal Colony The eerie of the story had me cracking my head over gathering all information about why you wrote what you wrote which still remains a mystery of sorts.The letters, the letters, Franz, they aren t the most romantic ones but definitely real, so real that one cannot fail to feel your concern and the long distance intimacy for your irreproachable lover Oh, I understand the art and challenge of writing letters is as tiresome as beautiful Words can be cruel, can be highly misunderstood, especially in letters that might get delayed or lost in transit With each passing day along the timeline I could only grow fonder and feel a petulant non satiable love with numerous uncertainties My dear Franz, you were right, anyone who has loved this much is nothing short of selfish, and that is alright, there s nothing like altruistic love After all, only a desperate one knows how to give all the love and yearns for it in the same magnitudes in return.I left all my judgements in anticipation of the replies from the other side and also, because I know what it takes to love in distance Wait manifests deep hunger but that turns a meal to a feast Waiting comes with its rewards, that might be true but you sure know the crippling frustration of it, so I now wait for a letter which I know would never arrive.with love,a fellow yearning human

  8. Melissa says:

    I have a beautiful old orange copy that I d probably chuck out the window to save from a fire.

  9. Cheryl says:

    Written kisses never arrive at their destination the ghosts drink them up along the way.I wish letter writing was something not so alien these days I sat this morning and imagined how much letters would help during a time like this, imagined what I would say in penmanship and not through computer font to someone across the world, or across states right now How would a letter from my friend in Atlanta, Georgia read at this particular moment from my brother traversing the streets of Minnesot Written kisses never arrive at their destination the ghosts drink them up along the way.I wish letter writing was something not so alien these days I sat this morning and imagined how much letters would help during a time like this, imagined what I would say in penmanship and not through computer font to someone across the world, or across states right now How would a letter from my friend in Atlanta, Georgia read at this particular moment from my brother traversing the streets of Minnesota with angst from my sister working nights at a hospital in New York City from my father living with curfews and harsh economic conditions in Liberia from my friends and family in Italy, Spain, Portugal They say there s a special way the mind communicates with the hand, or maybe it s in the way the hand communicates with the heart, when pen goes to paper Forget about text messages and chat screens, emails and social media updates, think about plain paper or note card, a simple pen or your favorite mechanical pencil OK yes, maybe it ends up typed before you send it You learn a lot about a person then I learned much about Franz Kafka, his eccentricities and sensibilities And I have to say, I admired the man much after reading this I m never afraid about you, even if it sometimes seems that way and it often does it s simply a weakness, a mood of the heart, which knows exactly why it s beating nevertheless Giants have their weaknesses as well I believe even Hercules fainted once With my teeth clenched, however, and with your eyes before me I can endure anything distance, anxiety, worry, letterlessness Kafka fell in love with Milena, a married woman translating his book, and they had an affair that occurred mostly through words He worried about her constantly, offered her money and companionship, planned trips for proposed dates, even adhered to her wishes, which included being friendly with her husband, although she was in a free love marriage He was a sort of recluse, a man who suffered from an illness that kept him indoors and for that we can be thankful because he produced some great works of art He feared the motives of people who tried to friend him, especially given his notoriety He had anxiety and found the world strange He was in love with Chekhov s writing This and many other things you learn when reading his letters to Milena.In these letters he is a relatable idiosyncraticI can t explain to you or to anybody what it s like inside me How can I begin to explain I can t even explain it to myself In these letters, he bares his soulThe only way to live is to be silent and still, here as well as there With some sadness, fine, what difference does that make

  10. Barbahella says:

    I m not sure any book has ever touched me in such a profound way, which perhaps sounds strange Within these pages, it feels as if you re getting to know a man from beyond the grave he writes to you every day And what letters Franz Kafka was a master letter writer and an infinitely complex, fascinating man.