The Magdalen

The Magdalen Kindle ´ Paperback
  • Paperback
  • 352
  • The Magdalen
  • Marita Conlon-McKenna
  • English
  • 05 February 2019
  • 0765305135

About the Author: Marita Conlon-McKenna

The Magdalen Kindle ´ Paperback magdalen free, The MagdalenThe Magdalen eBookBorn in Dublin in and brought up in Goatstown, Marita went to school at the Convent of the Sacred Heart, Mount Anville, later working in the family business, the bank, and a travel agency She has four children with her husband James, and they live in the Stillorgan area of DublinMarita was always fascinated by the Famine period in Irish history and read everything available on the subject When she heard a radio report of an unmarked children s grave from the Famine period being found under a hawthorn tree, she decided to write her first book, Under the Hawthorn TreePublished in May , the book was an immediate success and become a classic It has been translated into over a dozen languages, including Arabic, Bahasa, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Italian, Japanese and Irish The book has been read on RT Radio and is very popular in schools, both with teachers and pupils It has been made a supplementary curriculum reader in many schools and is also used by schools in Northern Ireland for EMU Education through Mutual Understanding projects It was also filmed by Young Irish Film Makers, in association with RT and Channel This is available as a DVDMarita has writtenbooks for children which were also very well received The Blue Horse reached No on the Bestseller List and won the BISTO BOOK OF THE YEAR Award No Goodbye, which tells of the heartbreak of a young family when their mother leaves home, was recommended by Book Trust in their guide for One Parent Families Safe Harbour is the story of two English children evacuated from London during World War ll to live with their grandfather in Greystones, Co Wicklow and was shortlisted for the BISTO Book of the Year Award A Girl Called Blue follows the life of an orphan, trying to find who she really is in a cold and strict orphanage Marita has also explored the world of fantasy with her book In Deep Dark WoodMarita has won several awards, including the International Reading Association Award, the Osterreichischer Kinder und Jugendbuchpreis, the Reading Association of Ireland Award and the Bisto Book of the Year Award.


The MagdalenThe Magdalen Kindle ´ Paperback magdalen free, The MagdalenThe Magdalen eBookThe wide open spaces of Connemara, filled with nothing but sea and sky, are all lost to Esther Doyle when she is betrayed by her lover, Conor Rejected by her family, she is sent to join the fallen women of the Holy Saints Convent in Dublin where, behind high granite walls, she works in the infamous Magdalen laundry while she awaits the birth of her babyAt the mercy of nuns, and working mostly in silence alongside the other Maggies, Esther spends her days in the steamy, sweatshop atmosphere of the laundry It is a grim existence, but Esther has little choice the convent is her only refuge, and its orphanage will provide shelter for her newborn childYet despite the harsh reality of her life, Esther gains support from this isolated community of women Learning through the experiences and the mistakes of the other Maggies, she begins to recognize her own strengths and determination to survive She recognizes, too, that it will take every ounce of courage to realize her dream of a new life for her and her child beyond they grey walls of the Holy Saints Convent.

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10 thoughts on “The Magdalen

  1. Clare O& says:

    Well done to this Irish author for her bravery and support of women This account of a fictional young woman s time in the Magdalene Laundries in the 1950s was written in 1999, before the Irish State had been forced to issue a fulsome apology to all the women so wronged Esther lives in a rural community in Connemara and with little excitement or world experience, her head is easily turned by a handsome lad who arrives to work a nearby spinster s farm This portion of the book actually rings ver Well done to this Irish author for her bravery and support of women This account of a fictional young woman s time in the Magdalene Laundries in the 1950s was written in 1999, before the Irish State had been forced to issue a fulsome apology to all the women so wronged Esther lives in a rural community in Connemara and with little excitement or world experience, her head is easily turned by a handsome lad who arrives to work a nearby spinster s farm This portion of the book actually rings very true with another book I read recently, Would You Marry A Farmer by Lorna Sixsmith, who examines the history of Irish farm domestic life The grown farmers looking for wives had to wait until their parents had died or retired, the younger sons had to find other work as the farm would only support one family, while the women had to get work elsewhere or, if they inherited a farm, find a man willing to work it, who might be all too keen to marry into the farm At the same time, in The Magdalen we see that children were generally cherished, even if the family had little money.Halfway the story changes as Esther s religion obsessed mother orders her pregnant daughter out of the house and the narrow minded community would not accept a single mother or her child The only recourse is a home for fallen women run by the nuns and Esther chooses to go to Dublin where nobody knows her In fact, she might as easily have gone to a nearby home, for high walls surround the place, the gates are locked and nobody ever leaves The women have to work right through their pregnancies, laundering clothes and linen, much of which is sent by hotels and, as a report showed in 2013, by the State Food is bad, beds cold, punishment and verbal abuse are frequent, prayers obligatory for their penance Then the babies are taken away the book doesn t say, but the report showed that they were sold Some women come in to the laundry as transfers from the orphanage next door, while others never leave and are worked to death in their middle age Esther gets to know these girls and women, each with a different tale to tell, and has to face the fact that she might never be allowed to leave and if she does, she has no home to return to and nothing but her determination to survive To those who wonder if the account is exaggerated the thousands of women so treated were put to work without pay, without social insurance or pension contributions they were totally dependent on the nuns for everything they were not allowed to leave if they did escape, the Garda were called and tracked them down and brought them back their babies were taken from them and sold As an international expert on slavery told us If there is a better definition of slavery I have yet to hear it Don t forget that nuns too, often had little or no choice in joining a convent, sent by their families, and received no pay or pension, but were obliged to hand over a dowry and any inheritances to the Catholic Church those who broughtmoney were better treated and were able to regard nuns from impoverished families as skivvies The Church profited greatly from their labour Aside from all the social tensions which are still relevant today as I write the State is inexplicably planning to build a maternity hospital on land which is owned by nuns who ran Magdalen Laundries, but which is heavily tied up in loans taken out by the nuns the Order owes millions to the State as compensation to the survivors of its institutions and has paid very little of it, but would be the de facto owners of the new hospital I like the small details of life Such as the photographer on O Connell Street, a well known sight who preserved views of the changing times for decades The author originally wrote children s books and historical accounts, so she has found amature theme as her success enabled her to continue writing Scenes are vividly described Nice colloquial Irish phrases are used, and if I find anything to criticise, that would be the occasional clumsy wording, like You heard me smirked Joan people don t smirk words This should have been picked up by an editor You may also be interested to read Would You Marry A Farmer A Light In The WindowDropping The Habit

  2. Helga Soenimanggar says:

    when i read this book then thanks God i am in Indonesia, and not in her place even not really diferent in here, religious people sometime can be bad but the way she lived and handle her problem can make me be strong too you go girl sometimes man always be coward and not take for responsibility for what he have done, hiding in his blancket and for man like that,,hmhm,, just go to hell,, and u wasn t man enough and don t call yourself a man if you can t take responsibilty for what you ve don when i read this book then thanks God i am in Indonesia, and not in her place even not really diferent in here, religious people sometime can be bad but the way she lived and handle her problem can make me be strong too you go girl sometimes man always be coward and not take for responsibility for what he have done, hiding in his blancket and for man like that,,hmhm,, just go to hell,, and u wasn t man enough and don t call yourself a man if you can t take responsibilty for what you ve done and not only women can me matrealistic,,man too so change your mind set girl.hehehhe

  3. Barbara says:

    Last week I received this book in the mail from the informal book group and had not ever heard of it So, I read a few pages and found myself instantly concerned and interested in the lead character, Esther It is a fast read, and I can see why it was a best seller in Ireland P.S I am glad I am not Catholic and did not grow up when she did.

  4. Homeschoolmama says:

    This is the second book I ve read by Marita Conlon McKenna She has a very engaging story telling style, and as someone who prefers nonfiction, I m impressed Her story here is a hard one, of an unwed pregnant young woman in 1950 s Ireland who has few options but to enter a home for unwed mothers The Magdalen e homes are run by nuns who are often harsh and punitive Some of the parts of the story were painful to read, but there were also enjoyable parts, with great character development and in This is the second book I ve read by Marita Conlon McKenna She has a very engaging story telling style, and as someone who prefers nonfiction, I m impressed Her story here is a hard one, of an unwed pregnant young woman in 1950 s Ireland who has few options but to enter a home for unwed mothers The Magdalen e homes are run by nuns who are often harsh and punitive Some of the parts of the story were painful to read, but there were also enjoyable parts, with great character development and interesting dialogue.Conlon McKenna bases her story lines on history she has done her research well I ll definitely look into readingof her writing

  5. Patti Thomas says:

    After seeing the movie Philomena, I was interested in these young women of Ireland Maggies I loved this book, following the story of Esther and the others taken in by the nuns and the difficulties they endured while in their care My heart goes out to all the women who actually went through this experience.

  6. mois reads says:

    EstherWhat to write those poor people left In the magdalen laundries cast out by there families and left in the nuns care I wouldn t put an animal in there care it is hard to read but there stories must be told 5 stars.

  7. Esther Turner says:

    Couldn t finish.nothing exceptional and did not hold my interest.

  8. Kathleen Anthony says:

    The magdalenBrilliant read really enjoyed this book looking forward to readingthoroughly enjoyed it well worth a read thank you

  9. Kristen says:

    For about five years now, I ve had a private list onknown as the library list , as it was simply for me to be able to keep track of what books I d look for request from the library Recently, I decided I should go to the earlier pages of the list, and see what still interested me This one was on the list since mid summer 2008, having learned about it after reading Ann Patchett s The Patron Saint of Liars The memory s working well today LOL Anyways, I snuck this one in despite not For about five years now, I ve had a private list onknown as the library list , as it was simply for me to be able to keep track of what books I d look for request from the library Recently, I decided I should go to the earlier pages of the list, and see what still interested me This one was on the list since mid summer 2008, having learned about it after reading Ann Patchett s The Patron Saint of Liars The memory s working well today LOL Anyways, I snuck this one in despite not being done with a previous book, since it s due back to the library today.Overall, it was decent While I had heard of the Magdalens before, and even read a similar story elsewhere, this is the first one actually set in Ireland in the 1950s It was a decent enough read, but nothing super outstanding I feel I ve been on a spate of just mediocre reads lately, and that s disturbing I felt like there was a ton of build up at the beginning, and a lot of promise, and then by the end, it was rather a let down I understand an author s desire to let the reader come to their own conclusion about a character s future, but I just like having all my ends tied This will forever be a statement of mine lol

  10. Lucas says:

    I did not like this book It was crafted well, and the prose is passable, but it lacks something I can t put my finger on the problem, but I do think the ending was terribly clipped It just ends abruptly, without building up to the finale You know it s the end because it s the last page, not because the drama was resolved in some way.