Soledad

Paperback  ó Soledad ePUB ´
    Paperback ó Soledad ePUB ´ resist falling for Richie a soulful, intense man from the neighborhood she also faces the greatest challenge of her life confronting the ghosts from her mother s past and salvaging their damaged relationship Evocative and wise, Soledad is a wondrous story of culture and chaos, family and integrity, myth and mysticism, from a Latina literary light."/>
  • Paperback
  • 240
  • Soledad
  • Angie Cruz
  • English
  • 07 January 2019
  • 0743212029

About the Author: Angie Cruz

Paperback ó Soledad ePUB ´ soledad pdf, SoledadSoledad KindleAngie Cruz was conceived in Dominican Republic and born in in New York City s Washington Heights She continued to travel to and from, every summer, until she was sixteen years old She went to La Guardia High School concentrating on Visual Arts and by default decided to follow a path in Fashion Design at Fashion Institute of Technology During those four years of college, she worked as a salesperson, manager and then window designer in an upscale Madison Ave boutique In , four of her children stories were featured on BET s Story Porch Soon after, she gave up her fashionista lifestyle to become a full time college student at SUNY Binghamton where her love affair with literature and history began She graduated from the NYU, MFA program in Her passion for literature fueled her desire to be active in community In , she co founded WILL Women In Literature Letters with Adelina Anthony and Marta Lucia, an organization that produced readings, workshops, and a conference using literature as a tool to build community and transform society In , WILL was put on hold due to lack of resources and the women s desire to maketime to write Angie Cruz has contributed shorter works to numerous periodicals including Latina Magazine, Callaloo and New York Times She has won awards for her writing and or activist work such as The New York Foundation of The Arts Fellowship, Barbara Deming Award, Yaddo, and The Camargo Fellowship She published two novels, Soledad and Let It Rain Coffee She currently is working on the screenplay for Soledad, optioned by Nueva York Productions and working on her third novel.


SoledadPaperback ó Soledad ePUB ´ soledad pdf, SoledadSoledad KindleAt eighteen, Soledad couldn t get away fast enough from her contentious family with their endless tragedies and petty fights Two years later, she s an art student at Cooper Union with a gallery job and a hip East Village walk up But when T a Gorda calls with the news that Soledad s mother has lapsed into an emotional coma, she insists that Soledad s return is the only cure Fighting the memories of open hydrants, leering men, and slick skinned teen girls with raunchy mouths and snapping gum, Soledad moves home to West th Street As she tries to tame her cousin Flaca s raucous behavior and to resist falling for Richie a soulful, intense man from the neighborhood she also faces the greatest challenge of her life confronting the ghosts from her mother s past and salvaging their damaged relationship Evocative and wise, Soledad is a wondrous story of culture and chaos, family and integrity, myth and mysticism, from a Latina literary light.

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10 thoughts on “Soledad

  1. Osvaldo says:

    Edit I have re read and taught this book many times in the nine years since I wrote the review below and upon reflection I think I am wrong about this book and it is better than I gave it credit for Maybe one day I will re write this review, but for now I think it can be safely ignored and I pumped it up by one star.My biggest beef with this book is not so much the book itself, but the pull quotes and excerpts from reviews all of which seem to hone in on the magical realist aspects of Edit I have re read and taught this book many times in the nine years since I wrote the review below and upon reflection I think I am wrong about this book and it is better than I gave it credit for Maybe one day I will re write this review, but for now I think it can be safely ignored and I pumped it up by one star.My biggest beef with this book is not so much the book itself, but the pull quotes and excerpts from reviews all of which seem to hone in on the magical realist aspects of the narrative, when really there is really only one scene that can be called magical realist and it is near the end and kind of heavy handed and doesn t really add much to the book at all It feels like since Angie Cruz is a Latina writer then her work has to be categorized that way in order to put it in the neighborhood of the only Latino writer anyone ever really takes seriously Gabriel Garcia Marquez, maybe Borges, sometimes But still this complaint is misleading, because I wish it were a littlefree in its depiction of reality, a littlewilling to play with time I kind of wish the book wasfrom Flaca s point of view instead of Soledad.So much of this genre of writing seems to be about reconnecting with and learning about a past our parents generation would rather forget but is nevertheless burdened with the awful shit that drove them out of the D.R or P.R or other places in Latin America and that their over protective irrational demeanor is meant to help us avoid I get that, and I think its an important topic to explore and there are moments in this novel where the contradictions of family and the ties of blood we imagine are depicted eloquently I just wanted I don t know

  2. Alysyn Reinhardt says:

    What I find the most compelling part s of Angie Cruz s novel is not the prose or magical realist elements, but its extremely accurate caricature of NYC The funniest and truest description of West Manhattan I wouldn t describe it as magical realist so much as having a dream motif The lyrical ending doesn t quite flow with the rest of the novel, but it doesn t spring up from nowhere.A novel equally about sexuality as it is about hybridity, it s not the average second generation story Soledad i What I find the most compelling part s of Angie Cruz s novel is not the prose or magical realist elements, but its extremely accurate caricature of NYC The funniest and truest description of West Manhattan I wouldn t describe it as magical realist so much as having a dream motif The lyrical ending doesn t quite flow with the rest of the novel, but it doesn t spring up from nowhere.A novel equally about sexuality as it is about hybridity, it s not the average second generation story Soledad is likable, without becoming boring Her mother is catatonic through the majority of the novel, yet their relationship becomes clear within the first few pages The three generations of females relationships mimic real family life This makes thehallucinatory elements of the novel believable when they arise.Flaca, Soledad s firecracker cousin, steals the show though Her parts, while mostly providing comedic lines, hold a lot of weight and really push this novel to true bildungsroman status.The novel is better as a beach read though than a thought provoking text Cruz s argument, if there even is one, is to basically learn how to communicate within the contexts of both romantic familial love The narrative itself is stronger, a quick, but bright read

  3. S.W. Gordon says:

    Angie Cruz tells a compelling authentic story about growing up in Washington Heights, NYC Without shying away from the ugly truths of poverty, crime and drugs culture, Cruz shows a community that looks out for one another and shares a sense of solidarity They are tight like an extended family Beautifully rendered Cruz s strong female protagonist Soledad counterbalances Junot Diaz s male centric protagonist Junior I got the sense that Diaz glorified the male chauvinism of the Dominican cul Angie Cruz tells a compelling authentic story about growing up in Washington Heights, NYC Without shying away from the ugly truths of poverty, crime and drugs culture, Cruz shows a community that looks out for one another and shares a sense of solidarity They are tight like an extended family Beautifully rendered Cruz s strong female protagonist Soledad counterbalances Junot Diaz s male centric protagonist Junior I got the sense that Diaz glorified the male chauvinism of the Dominican culture while Cruz shows that Dominican women are not mere suffering saints They are an independent force unto their own The story and the characters were so strong that I can overlook the distracting switching from multiple first person narrations to third person with several POV s The rebirth of Soledad into her mother s arms in the waters of the Tres Bocas Caves brought everything full circle and was very moving

  4. Anna says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here read for senior sem THIS BOOK IS SOUL CRUSHING AND AFFIRMING ABOUT A MOTHER AND DAUGHTER UNDERSTANDING GENERATIONAL TRAUMA AND ALSO CULTURAL TRAUMA BY LIKE LISTENING TO EACH OTHER a summary that does not do this book justice at all when olivia screams at the end she breaks through generations and years of her own abuse because that is the moment that soledad needs her even though the whole book is framed as soledad coming home to save olivia really olivia saves soledad

  5. Cookie says:

    I understood Soledad You don t have to relate to the characters in order to understand Soledad, her family and their stuggles The writing doesn t flow consistently, but the author kept me intrigued.

  6. Stephanie Borjas says:

    If you love spanish lit, this is it One of the best books I ve ever read, the author came to speak to our class she was wonderful If you love spanish lit, this is it One of the best books I ve ever read, the author came to speak to our class she was wonderful

  7. Zezee says:

    For Goodreads reviews As posted on Zezee with Books.My thoughts Have you ever read a story that mirrors your family so well that you feel as if the book was written for you Such was my experience when reading Soledad It wasn t exactly the same as my life, but the characters and how the characters react to their situations were familiar It s always like that just when I think I don t give a shit about what my family thinks, they find a way to drag me back home Cruz had me at the first sente For Goodreads reviews As posted on Zezee with Books.My thoughts Have you ever read a story that mirrors your family so well that you feel as if the book was written for you Such was my experience when reading Soledad It wasn t exactly the same as my life, but the characters and how the characters react to their situations were familiar It s always like that just when I think I don t give a shit about what my family thinks, they find a way to drag me back home Cruz had me at the first sentence and I find that weird I knew from reading that sentence that I would enjoy the story and that I would find it hard to pull away from it for long Why is that How can some authors pull me in from so early in the story while others can t Is it a matter or style or voice I d really like to puzzle this out.The narrator s voice drew me into the story The story is told in first person but from multiple perspectives with Soledad as our protagonist Soledad is a young, 20 something woman who has left home to seek freedom and space from her family She is an artist and works part time at a gallery Her family are immigrants from Dominica Republic who settled in Washington Heights, a bad part of New York City, where Soledad has spent most of her life When the story opens, Soledad is returning home to visit her ailing mother.I could relate to Soledad in many ways I could relate to her struggles as an immigrant, as the child of immigrants, and as a young woman developing ideals that conflict with what her family believe and enforce I could relate to her frustration with having to live with family members who constantly pry into her life and refuse to acknowledge that she s no longer a child, and I could relate to her skepticism about her family s spiritual beliefs When Soledad sees her mother, Olivia, she believes that Olivia is in need of medical help due to her semi catatonic state But Soledad s grandmother and aunt assure her that Olivia is simply resolving some issues in her sleep Soledad thinks they re crazy My grandmother is split between ideas, country, her dreams and what s real In this way, Cruz includes elements of magical realism in her story Olivia is indeed resolving issues in her sleep She is haunted by her past and the magnitude of all she is dealing with seems so great that she has become speechless and near immobile at times Ghosts from her past manifest in the present and cause trouble for both Olivia and her family members so her sister, Soledad s aunt named Gorda, turns to her herbs to cleanse Olivia s apartment of its bad spirits.Spirits, bad juju, and the like are easily believed by Soledad s family but Soledad fights against this at first as she battles with her cultures and identities, being both an American and a Dominican and living in America and thus influenced by American ideals but having a strong Dominican upbringing with family who still hold onto their Dominican beliefs As the story progresses, Soledad learnsabout herself, her parents, and origin and begins to accept herself for who she is and to feel comfortable being Soledad an immigrant from Washington Heights with a family that some might call crazy.I enjoyed watching all the characters develop Though Soledad is the protagonist, the story focuses on all members of her family who are all affected and changed by what has happened to Soledad s mother I did not have a favorite character in this story because though I could relate to Soledad on many levels, I did not like her I thought her too stuck up, stoosh is the Jamaican slang, and though I understood why that is, I couldn t shake my initial reaction to her I did, however, like Ciego, a blind, wise old man who dishes out advice to everyone, and Soledad s grandmother was pretty cool too because she reminded me of my own However, Flaca, Soledad s cousin, was an annoyance because of her immaturity but her character rang true to me for how girls her age sometimes behave.Though I enjoyed the story, I was not a fan of the writing It s sometimes descriptive, which I liked, but other times the sentences threw me off and I can t say what caused that It wasn t the inclusion of Spanish words, which adds authenticity to the story, I just don t know why Also, no quotation marks were included to indicate speech, which sometimes made me confused but I got by I did not like the ending It s hard to say what happens It s pretty open ended but to me, it seems that the story ended with storylines still hanging.Overall 1 2It s a pretty good story and I recommend it if you re looking for something short but good that focuses on family, relationships, and identity I also recommend it if you re looking for a diverse read recommendation or a story that includes magical realism I enjoyed reading it and loved that I could easily see parts of my and my family s experiences reflected in the story.By the way, Richie seems like a really sweet, really sexy guy.or so I imagined him.Quotes from the book Never be afraid of making a mess That s the fastest way of getting thing done Soledad, when you write something down, it keeps it alive There is a certain power to words, memories, ideas when one writes them down

  8. Ashling says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here In terms of interesting themes, this book was good It dealt with interesting issues I understood a lot of why some characters acted the way they did However, the lack of clear dialogue and the somewhat consuming storytelling really took me out of the novel I didn t enjoy having to try to figure out who was talking and when I also really didn t like some of the characters In part, because I didnt understand them but also I think they weren t necessarily supposed to be likable Flaca, for ex In terms of interesting themes, this book was good It dealt with interesting issues I understood a lot of why some characters acted the way they did However, the lack of clear dialogue and the somewhat consuming storytelling really took me out of the novel I didn t enjoy having to try to figure out who was talking and when I also really didn t like some of the characters In part, because I didnt understand them but also I think they weren t necessarily supposed to be likable Flaca, for example, a self centered, immature 15 year old Like logically, I understand she s 15 and therefore not going to be mature and think about other people but she really just doesn t care about anyone but herself And I understand that Olivia is supposed to be redeemed of sorts by the end but I just don t feel anything for her Her situation is and was terrible, but I still disagree with her parenting The magical realism was interesting, but I didn t understand the last scene in the DR The photo thing Like was that supposed to make everything okay again I get that it was supposed to be like leaving that open for the future but parts of it just doesn t work for me I am also not Latinx so maybe I m missing the cultural connection

  9. Xiomara Almanzar says:

    I first read this book when I was fifteen years old for my Spanish class in high school My teacher at the time, Mr Segura, reassured the class that Angie Cruz, was going to be one of the brightest stars in Spanish literature As young woman, I remembered liking the book and liking Cruz s bubbly personality As part of the Spanish class, we were able to meet Cruz a few weeks after completing the novel A few years passed and she released her second book which I also greatly appreciated.Fifteen I first read this book when I was fifteen years old for my Spanish class in high school My teacher at the time, Mr Segura, reassured the class that Angie Cruz, was going to be one of the brightest stars in Spanish literature As young woman, I remembered liking the book and liking Cruz s bubbly personality As part of the Spanish class, we were able to meet Cruz a few weeks after completing the novel A few years passed and she released her second book which I also greatly appreciated.Fifteen years later, I decided to re read Soledad, in hopes of reconnecting with my Latin American roots and I am glad that I did As an adult, I connected with the book in ways I could had never connected with as a teenager Soledad beautifully captures what it is being the daughter of an immigrant Latina mother and the struggles that comes with that identity Cruz vividly describes the struggles of immigrant families living in Washington Heights and the struggles that comes when one tries to hold onto secrets that eat away at the soul My favorite out of all of Cruz s three books, Soledad will always hold a special place in my life

  10. Vianny says:

    Soleda represents so many parts of me and so many of the women I ve known Having been raised in such Dominican spaces, I thought I knew better and by better I figured that assimilation was the key here in America Boy was I wrong, so was Soledad As Cruz progresses in the narrative of this young woman escaping her best parts, not understanding that it is there that her best virtues and strengths are rooted, life s reality check brings her to a place in time that meshes the past, the present, th Soleda represents so many parts of me and so many of the women I ve known Having been raised in such Dominican spaces, I thought I knew better and by better I figured that assimilation was the key here in America Boy was I wrong, so was Soledad As Cruz progresses in the narrative of this young woman escaping her best parts, not understanding that it is there that her best virtues and strengths are rooted, life s reality check brings her to a place in time that meshes the past, the present, the experiences and aspirations of generations before her that leaves you winded She takes the reader through a journey that cannot be predicted and digs deep into your own psyche where you cannot discern between what you ve ingested and what you ve lived I was disappointed with a love story untold because I am a romantic at heart, and yet it is incredibly impactful how Cruz leaves you with the identification of Soledad as the problem or her actions and perception of who she really is and where she comes from and in turn leaves you questioning, me questioning, what is so powerful about myself, and my people, that scares me away from who I can be