Crisis of the House Divided: An Interpretation of the Issues in the Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Crisis of the House Divided: An Interpretation of the
  • Paperback
  • 472
  • Crisis of the House Divided: An Interpretation of the Issues in the Lincoln-Douglas Debates
  • Harry V. Jaffa
  • English
  • 12 May 2018
  • 0226391183

About the Author: Harry V. Jaffa

Crisis of the House Divided: An Interpretation of the crisis epub, house kindle, divided: mobile, interpretation book, issues book, lincoln douglas pdf, debates free, Crisis of ebok, the House pdf, Crisis of the House Divided: An Interpretation of the Issues in the Lincoln-Douglas Debatesof the House kindle, of the House Divided: An download, Crisis of the House Divided: An Interpretation of the Issues in the Lincoln-Douglas Debates KindleA graduate of Yale University, Harry the House PDF/EPUB ¿ Victor Jaffa taught at Queens College, the City College of New York and at the University of Chicago before earning his doctorate in at the New School for Social Research in Crisis of PDF \ New York A student of Leo Strauss, Jaffa taught at Ohio State University from , and over the next years was on the faculties of Claremont McKenna College and Claremont Graduate School in Claremont, Calif He was of the House ePUB ☆ the Henry Salvatori research professor of political philosophy from , when he became professor emeritus and a distinguished fellow at the Claremont Institute.


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10 thoughts on “Crisis of the House Divided: An Interpretation of the Issues in the Lincoln-Douglas Debates

  1. Gary Inbinder says:

    The ultimate guide to the Lincoln Douglas debates and a must read for anyone interested in U.S history.

  2. Gavin says:

    An extremely rich, but dense look at the Lincoln Douglas debates by Harry Jaffa Not something to rip through, which I did not, it took me nine months of definitions, notes, and rabbit holes I m glad that I stuck with it and the highest praise that I could make is that I m ready to start it all over That being said, there are other books on this subject that I wish to hit before I come back to it.Originally published in 1959 that seems a world away, almost as far as the debates themselves App An extremely rich, but dense look at the Lincoln Douglas debates by Harry Jaffa Not something to rip through, which I did not, it took me nine months of definitions, notes, and rabbit holes I m glad that I stuck with it and the highest praise that I could make is that I m ready to start it all over That being said, there are other books on this subject that I wish to hit before I come back to it.Originally published in 1959 that seems a world away, almost as far as the debates themselves Apparently the big thought of that era was Lincoln was responsible for the Civil War and Jaffa develops both sides of this line of thinking To my mind, and I m no expert here, Jaffa comes down as Douglas and his supporters by not acting and by avoiding dealing with the moral question end up causing the war.A few examples of my view When Senator Foote of Mississippi had in 1948 invited Senator Hale of New Hampshire to visit Mississippi and grace the highest tree in the forest there which earned him the sobriquet of Hangman Foote , Hale responded by inviting Foote to New Hampshire, where he assured him a respectful hearing in every town and hamlet p 334 In his Chicago speech of July 10, 1858, Lincoln sounded a theme which echoed through the debates He spoke of the annual celebration of independence, as he always loved to do, in terms which suggest nothing so much as the Feast of the Passover, celebrating the deliverance of the Hebrew people from Pharaoh s Egypt, or of Easter, celebrating the deliverance of the world from original sin p 359 360 Although volume upon volume is written to prove slavery a very good thing, we never hear of the man who wishes to take the good of it by being a save himself Lincoln p 337 We would say that opinion in Illinois in 1858 was probably about as favorable to Negro citizenship as opinion in Arkansas today is favorable to public school integration p 382Douglas tends to try and dodge and weave his way through avoiding the slavery question When Lincoln ask Douglas if he would support the Supreme Court ruling that slavery was wrong Douglas doesn t answer the question, but attempts to hide behind a statement that no justice would be so insane and that to do so would go against the Constitution All in all, a book well worth reading, but take care you either will love it or drop it I look forward to Jaffa s sequel A NEW BIRTH OF FREEDOM

  3. David Montgomery says:

    A book of superb legal and philosophic analysis, though reading it today one is put off by the degree to which it is fixated on historiographic disputes of the 1950s Jaffa undertakes a thorough but mostly fair defense of Abraham Lincoln, pre presidency, against historians of his day who were taking the side of Stephen Douglas and his popular sovereignty doctrine.Lincoln s star has risen somewhat since this work s original publication perhaps in no small part BECAUSE of this work s publicati A book of superb legal and philosophic analysis, though reading it today one is put off by the degree to which it is fixated on historiographic disputes of the 1950s Jaffa undertakes a thorough but mostly fair defense of Abraham Lincoln, pre presidency, against historians of his day who were taking the side of Stephen Douglas and his popular sovereignty doctrine.Lincoln s star has risen somewhat since this work s original publication perhaps in no small part BECAUSE of this work s publication But its careful reading and contextualization of Lincoln s speeches, as well as a shorter preceding explication of Douglas s point of view, remains sharp and still relevant today The book does presume a fairly hefty preknowledge of the life and career of Abraham Lincoln and the major political controversies of the 1850s not merely a basic understanding of popular sovereignty, Bleeding Kansas and Dred Scott but details of particular speeches and the exact path certain laws took through Congress The book is still readable with a moderate historical background, but the occasional omission of important context combines with its already intricate political philosophy to make this a pretty tough slog, though always fascinating

  4. Nathan Albright says:

    This was my first introduction to Harry Jaffa and his political thinking some two decades or so ago and it remains a book I enjoy reading from time to time, although I have not read or reviewed it forthan a decade and so I thought it worthwhile to do so as part of my quarantine reading project to catch up on the late thinker s writings as a whole The influence that Jaffa has had on my own political thinking has been considerable, not least because it offered a deeply conservative viewpoi This was my first introduction to Harry Jaffa and his political thinking some two decades or so ago and it remains a book I enjoy reading from time to time, although I have not read or reviewed it forthan a decade and so I thought it worthwhile to do so as part of my quarantine reading project to catch up on the late thinker s writings as a whole The influence that Jaffa has had on my own political thinking has been considerable, not least because it offered a deeply conservative viewpoint that had a very high view of virtue, a high view of charitable and sympathetic reading of political thinkers and other writers in general, as well as a high degree of respect and regard for the importance of egalitarianism to the American and biblical traditions which I hold so near and dear This particular book was also greatly influential to me because of its structure in the way that it sets up a case for Douglas thinking as sympathetically as possible and then shows how Lincoln answers the challenges of his revisionist critics for his pre Civil War behavior and remains an example for us today.This book consists of four parts that last forthan 400 pages After acknowledgements and a preface the book contains an introduction that looks at 1958 as being a crisis in historical judgment that viewed the Lincoln Douglas debates as unimportant 1 as well as the alternatives present in Illinois between Lincoln and Douglas in 1858 2 The second part of the book then consists of Jaffa making the best case for Douglas by discussing slavery 3 , manifest destiny 4 , the legal power and practical impotence of federal prohibitions of slavery in the territories 5 , the question of the the superseding of the Missouri Compromise by the Compromise of 1850 6 , the intentions of Douglas in passing the Kansas Nebraska act 7 , and the tragedy of the extremism that resulted 8 After that the author discusses the political education of Abraham Lincoln III by giving a detailed discussion of his views on political salvation in the Lyceum speech 9 and on political moderation in the temperance address 10 The book then ends with Jaffa s tour de force case for Lincoln IV with chapters on the legal 11 and political 12 tendencies towards the expansion of slavery, the intrinsic evil of repealing the Missouri compromise 13 , the universal meaning of the Declaration of Independence 14 , the form and substance of political freedom in the modern world 15 , what was true and false about popular sovereignty 16 , the abstract and political meanings of equality 17 , the natural limits of slavery expansion 18 , the Republican fidelity to Lincoln s principles after 1860 19 , and the end of manifest destiny 20 , after which there are two appendices that discuss some historical background to the debates i as well as some notes on the Dred Scott decision ii before an index.It is remarkable that in 1858 that ordinary people in Illinois were willing to sit out for three hours of political speeches from two political candidates where instead of being promised various aspects of aid and assistance for the government there was a detailed policy discussion of issues of the spread of slavery in the Union and how it related to the policy of the three branches of government It is hard to imagine very many contemporary politicians on any level that would be capable of focusing their attention on matters of basic philosophical importance or an audience that would be able to listen attentively to such matters without finding it to be too wonkish and boring That said, we are all the better for having had such debates recorded for us to read and for having Professor Jaffa speak so eloquently about what is at stake to remind us that the questions of liberty and the legitimacy of popular regimes and the morality that legitimizes such regimes are questions that remain with us today and that we would do well to thinkabout in such times as we now experience where faith in ourselves is so unwarranted and faith in our institutions is so imperiled

  5. Daniel says:

    It is said thatbooks have been written about Abraham Lincoln than about any other person with the exception of Jesus I d suggest that if you want to read one book about Lincoln s thought, this should be the one Stephen Douglas, the most powerful member of the Senate and a likely Democratic candidate for president, authored the Kansas Nebraska Act of 1854, repealing the Missouri Compromise Lincoln, whose public career was seemingly at an end, emerged as the leading opponent of the Act i It is said thatbooks have been written about Abraham Lincoln than about any other person with the exception of Jesus I d suggest that if you want to read one book about Lincoln s thought, this should be the one Stephen Douglas, the most powerful member of the Senate and a likely Democratic candidate for president, authored the Kansas Nebraska Act of 1854, repealing the Missouri Compromise Lincoln, whose public career was seemingly at an end, emerged as the leading opponent of the Act in Illinois After his celebrated debates against Douglas in the Senate campaign of 1858, he was the intellectual leader of the anti Kansas Nebraska forces nationally Lincoln maintained that the Missouri Compromise, by controlling the spread of slavery in the territories gave assurance that slavery was on an ultimate course of extinction The repeal of the Compromise, in his view, compounded by the Dred Scott decision of 1857 raised the horrifying prospect that slavery might spread to the nation as a whole and become permanently established When Jaffa wrote this book, the prevailaing opinion among historians was that Lincoln s fervent opposition to the Kansas Nebraska Act was unnecessary Slavery would never have spread to Kansas, according to the historians, regardless of the repeal of the Missouri Compromise Lincoln stirred up the nation to such conflict for his own political gain that an unnecessary Civil War became inevitable Jaffa s book opposed that view Jaffa maintained that the historians make complacent assumptions about the likelihood of the spread of slavery that are doubtful at best, and that Lincoln s position was deeply rooted in correct principles Following an introduction setting forth the terms of the debate, Jaffa first presents in extended form the case for Douglas He treats Douglas with respect and shows Douglas to have had a serious, responsible position Because Douglas was not as articulate as Lincoln, Jaffa has to tease Douglas position out of the stances Douglas took on numerous specific issues As a result, these chapters are historically dense and will be difficult reading for anyone not pretty conversant with American history from 1846 1860 But stay with it You will be able to get the gist, and the payoff that will follow will be well worth the trouble Next come two long chapters analyzing two of Lincoln s early speeches, the Lyceum Address and the Temperance Address The speeches are short and you will want to read them before reading these chapters Jaffa s analyses, though occasionally a bit over the top, are brilliant Then comes the high point of the book, the chapters setting forth Lincoln s position in his struggle with Douglas in the 1850s They are as good a statement of Lincoln s views as you will find In spots they rise to magnificent eloquence

  6. Diane says:

    Well written history of the Lincoln Douglas debates that looks at the underlying assumptions of both sides The author assumes that the reader already has a great deal of familiarity with the issues surrounding the debates, and he often references other scholars on the topic Therefore, I would not recommend this to the general reader, but would whole heartedly recommend it to the 19th century American history Civil War buff.

  7. Paul says:

    Quite simply the finest work of American political science in the 20th century Jaffa does not hesitate to deploy his enormous erudition and compositional talent against various dominant schools of historical and philosophical thought several do not survive the encounter Lincoln emerges in all his glory.One warning Jaffa is a bold writer of great power and subtlety The reader would do well to maintain a certain detachment from his pedagogic charms, lest he be carried away.

  8. John Minster says:

    An incredibly dense, well researched book that covers the Lincoln Douglas debates in a truly full manner Jaffa does an excellent job explaining the thought of and differences between both men, while providing a work which thoroughly covers not just the debates, but all the major divisions of the pre war era.

  9. Thomas Mackie says:

    Early counter attack against the Bumbling Generation and needless war themes in Civil War studies It still has a strong case Though it is old it is important reading for serious Lincoln studies and a counter to the mythic anti Lincoln bashing still common in very conservative circles.

  10. Josh Craddock says:

    Once you read this book, you ll never look at the Lincoln Douglas debates the same way again Jaffa s explication of the issues is incomparable The highlight of the book, however, is his interpretation of the Lyceum Address, which contextualizes Lincoln s understanding of the Declaration and his later role in preserving the American experiment in self government.