A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivência

A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivência PDF/EPUB
    A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivência PDF/EPUB e in meras ilustra es Com texto claro, objetivo e descontra do, constr i uma narrativa fascinante e faz uma revela o surpreendente do que o homem e a vida s o capazes de suportar."/>
  • Kindle Edition
  • 392
  • A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivência
  • Frances Ashcroft
  • 18 August 2019
  • null

About the Author: Frances Ashcroft

A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivência PDF/EPUB vida book, limite: mobile, ciência pdf, sobrevivência pdf, A vida epub, no limite: ebok, A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivênciavida no limite: pdf, vida no limite: A ciência epub, A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivência KindleFrances Ashcroft MA PhD FRS is no limite: PDF Î a British physiologist She is Royal Society GlaxoSmithKline Research Professor in the University of Oxford She is a fellow of Trinity College and, with A vida Kindle - Kay Davies and Peter Donnelly is a director of the Oxford Centre for Gene FunctionHer research group has an international reputation for work on insulin secretion, type II diabetes and neonatal vida no limite: PDF ☆ diabetes Her work with Professor Andrew Hattersley has helped enable children born with diabetes to switch from insulin injections to tablet therapyShe is the author of the book Life at the Extremes The Science of Survival.


A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivênciaA vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivência PDF/EPUB vida book, limite: mobile, ciência pdf, sobrevivência pdf, A vida epub, no limite: ebok, A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivênciavida no limite: pdf, vida no limite: A ciência epub, A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivência KindleA Vida no Limite um relato no limite: PDF Î espetacular da ci ncia da sobreviv ncia e dos desafios que enfrentamos em ambientes altamente hostis em grandes altitudes, sob intensa press o, no A vida Kindle - calor e no frio extremos, na velocidade, no espa o Frances Ashcroft concentra se principalmente na fisiologia seu campo de trabalho , mas ponteia a argumenta o com conhecimentos e curiosidades vida no limite: PDF ☆ de reas t o variadas quanto medicina, hist ria da ci ncia, esporte e zoologia comparada Acrescenta ainda relatos autobiogr ficos, uma vez que se aventurou em quase todos esses extremos, e in meras ilustra es Com texto claro, objetivo e descontra do, constr i uma narrativa fascinante e faz uma revela o surpreendente do que o homem e a vida s o capazes de suportar.

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10 thoughts on “A vida no limite: A ciência da sobrevivência

  1. Marco says:

    As a Christmas present to myself, I decided to read Life at the Extremes The Science of Survival by Frances Ashcroft, professor of physiology at the University of Oxford And what a Christmas present it was This book was a hidden gem in the library.Life at the Extremes is all about the effects of the extreme environmental conditions on the human body, including heat and cold, height and depths, space, microgravity and, with regards to sport, pushing your body to the limit.Highly accessible and As a Christmas present to myself, I decided to read Life at the Extremes The Science of Survival by Frances Ashcroft, professor of physiology at the University of Oxford And what a Christmas present it was This book was a hidden gem in the library.Life at the Extremes is all about the effects of the extreme environmental conditions on the human body, including heat and cold, height and depths, space, microgravity and, with regards to sport, pushing your body to the limit.Highly accessible and filled with science, this book is perfect for anyone, but I would especially recommend this to A Level Biology students like me or those who want to do Biology or Medicine at university The book covers so many aspects of physiology that we experience almost daily in our lives like how we regulate heat and cold, the energy demands of speed and stamina, and aspects that we do not, such as living in microgravity and high altitude, etc.The book is divided into 7 sections Life at the Top, Life under Pressure, Life in the Hot Zone, Life in the Cold, Life in the Fast Lane, The Final Frontier and The Outer Limits.Life at the Top talks about the high life literally It talks about altitude sickness and why it occurs What I love most about this book, and especially this chapter, is that there is also some history of how these conditions were studied.Altitude sickness is a condition that usually occurs when you re at a high altitude usually above 8,000 feet , which occurs when you climb up too quickly without allowing your body to acclimatise to the conditions on top of the mountain.This occurs because the air pressure at higher altitudes are lower than at sea level As a result, the amount of oxygen we get into our blood is lowered and the body has to acclimatise If this acclimatisation process does not occur, the condition can be fatal and there are unpleasant symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, exhaustion and nausea, which take their toll when you re climbing a snow coated and dangerous mountain like the Everest.In the chapter, Ashcroft discusses the lungs and the role of haemoglobin in our red blood cells and how this globular protein transports oxygen to our cells The role of the hormone erythropoetin, the chemical that stimulates the production of red blood cells, is also discussed and it is interesting to note that some athletes used this hormone to improve their performance by using it to increase their red blood cell levels, and it is eveninteresting to note that it is probably of little benefit The next chapter, Life under Pressure, is about how humans cope in the depths of the oceans There is definitely a lotscience in this chapter, especially the physics of pressure, which can sometimes be difficult to keep up with, however, all is explained clearly History about the development of the diving suit is recounted and how the first cases of the bends came about.The bends, or decompression sickness, occurs when a diver who has been at depths of over 10m under water for a long period of time rises quickly This happens because a lot of nitrogen dissolves into the blood under pressure When the diver rises quickly, the pressure is suddenly lowered and so the nitrogen can no longer stay dissolved into the blood and so it comes out of the solution to form gas bubbles inside your body and blocks the flow of blood in small blood vessels, resulting in joint pain and paralysis, especially when the blood vessels to the brain are blocked The phenomenon is similar to the fizzing of a fizzy drink like coca cola when you open a can Carbon dioxide dissolved under high pressure suddenly comes out of the solution as the pressure drops The condition can be fatal due to the lack of oxygen and nutrients provided to the cells and tissues when blood vessels are blocked.The biology in the chapter is incredible fascinating Ashcroft also explains that whales don t get the bends because they limit the gas dissolving into their blood by breathing out before a dive, and limiting blood flow to the lungs.Chapter three, Life in the Hot Zone, discusses how heat affects the human body and how we sense heat There is also plentiful history about the development of the thermometer Ashcroft talks about how and why we regulate our bodies homoeostasis, the processes that occur in the body to keep our body functioning normally. Homeostasis is important to keep our body functioning properly, and this involves regulating the temperature so that the core body temperature reaches the just right temperature, which is important as our metabolism depends on enzymes which work best at the just right, optimum temperature This is why when it s too cold or too hot, we can die from hypothermia or hyperthermia, because cellular activity is affected hugely.There is also a lot about physiology in this chapter, especially about the thergulatory system and how the skin disperses body heat into the atmosphere, but the chapter reads well because it is in the form of stories and analogies so it doesn t sound like a textbook As a result, it is so easy to become engrossed in this book.Life in the Cold is about life in the cold Frostbite, hypothermia and related conditions are explained in this chapter Other animals are also discussed, indeed a large part of this section talks about how different animals are adapted to coldness, penguins especially.I think it is amazing how Emperor penguins can coordinate themselves to be in a large group to conserve heat and huddle for warmth, facing continuous darkness and temperatures below 70 degrees Celsius Incredible It is also amazing that babies are born with brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, which have a greater number of ATP producing, energy providing mitochondria Mitochondria produce ATP which can provide energy to burn the fat and act as a heater for babies so that they do not suffer from hypothermia Babies have this brown fat because of their larger surface area to volume ratio, which means that their rate of heat loss is much quicker than in adults.ATP is discussed indetail in Life in the Fast Lane, the chapter about pushing the human body to the limits of speed, strength and stamina So much information is provided but it is beneficial most especially for A Level Biology students I think this is the most interesting section of the book Ashcroft describes how muscle contraction occurs, from the triggering by calcium ions, to how glycogen stores are depleting, turning them into glucose, which is used to make ATP, to the protein filaments interlocking and breaking bonds and reforming them Incredible.The chapter also discusses the difference between men and women s physique, and how it contributes to being better in a certain sport For example, women tend to have a greater fat percentage than men do, so women are often better in long distance swimming where buoyancy is important, and men are better in sprinting where as little a ratio of fat to muscle mass is required The chapter ends with the thought that although moderate exercise can slow bone loss in older women.The next chapter, The Final Frontier, truly appealed to my inner space nerd It is so enthralling to hear about astronauts in outer space taking that giant leap for mankind, but it is evenengrossing to hear the stories in relation to the effects of microgravity in space Space is the ultimate frontier the ultimate extreme It is a vacuum It is freezing but the ultraviolet rays from the sun would burn your skin To get there, you must be accelerated to over 25,056 miles per hour, subjecting you to extreme g forces and when you re there, you exist in microgravity As a result, many physiological changes occur such as a shift in body fluids.Usually, fluid accumulated in the lower half of the body due to gravity in microgravity, body fluids migrate to the chest and head and redistribute again, causing the moon face appearance of some astronauts The heart does not pump as hard due to not having to pump against gravity.Equilibrioception the sense of balance can also be damaged Dizziness can occur due to Space Adaptation Syndrome, a condition suffered by astronauts in orbit when the state of weightlessness stops their vestibular system from working properly Reduced production of red blood cells, bone loss, muscle wasting these are all trials and tribulations that greet the brave astronaut in space.The last chapter, The Outer Limits, although not about human physiology, is also very fascinating How some microorganisms can grow at 113 degrees Celsius, and others can grow at a pH of 2 is incredible And even life without oxygen is possible For certain microorganisms, that is It seems so bizarre that oxygen, something that we is vital to our survival, is toxic to other organisms.Ashcroft truly amazes the reader in this chapter It is very well researched and has prompted me to do some research myself it turns out that there are microorganisms that have even adapted to build their DNA using arsenic, which is toxic to humans Wow Such is the incredible diversity of life.I cannot recommend this book enough It is a delightful read and it bears witness to the human tenacity Part survival guide, part scientific textbook, Life at the Extremes should be in the shelves of every armchair adventurer, explorer, science enthusiast and Biology students

  2. Fidan Selim-Zade says:

    Amazing book on the human physiology, explicitly describing how the processes in human body are reacting on the extreme conditions, such as high low pressure and temperature, microgravity and etc Great examples on the other living organisms not only surviving but actively flourishing at the environment, fatal to the human beings, and what are the natural mechanisms allowing them to do so Recommended

  3. Dеnnis says:

    I noticed that people complain about abundance of facts in the book, which otherwise could be easily fetched to you by Google Yes there are facts, numbers and statistics And for good reason.However, these digits and stories of history s firsts don t constitute the bulk of the book, or at least the most interesting and practical part of it IMHO readers benefit most from detailed explanation of how your body and those of some other living creatures reacts to exposure to most extreme condition I noticed that people complain about abundance of facts in the book, which otherwise could be easily fetched to you by Google Yes there are facts, numbers and statistics And for good reason.However, these digits and stories of history s firsts don t constitute the bulk of the book, or at least the most interesting and practical part of it IMHO readers benefit most from detailed explanation of how your body and those of some other living creatures reacts to exposure to most extreme conditions at different levels It is extremely curious and enlightening A lot of these facts especially regarding helping the injured run against the grain of conventional wisdom

  4. Mared Owen says:

    I genuinely feel like I ve learnt SO MUCH from reading this book It reminds me of some of my all time favourite books that I read as a child not Malory Towers, but books like 100 Most Dangerous Things on the Planet, Deadly Peril and anything to do with catastrophes It was a real joy to read Life At The Extremes, just as those aforementioned books were enjoyable, because there were new facts and ideas lurking on every page, and I couldn t help but share my newly discovered information with an I genuinely feel like I ve learnt SO MUCH from reading this book It reminds me of some of my all time favourite books that I read as a child not Malory Towers, but books like 100 Most Dangerous Things on the Planet, Deadly Peril and anything to do with catastrophes It was a real joy to read Life At The Extremes, just as those aforementioned books were enjoyable, because there were new facts and ideas lurking on every page, and I couldn t help but share my newly discovered information with anyone around me, probably to their dismay

  5. Ekrem says:

    nsan v cudunun s n rlar n zorlayacak kadar hayat u larda ya ayan o k k az nl na mensupsan z bu kitab muhakkak okumal s n z Ama benim gibi insanl n geri kalan tembel y n n mutlu bir par as ysan z da genel k lt r a s ndan okuman z faydal olabilir Kitap boyunca yer yer klasik ngiliz espri anlay na maruz kal nsa da kullan lan dil kolay ve anla l r Bask kalitesi de ayr ca ba ar l.

  6. GlobeRunner says:

    Fascinating Scientific findings are interspersed with interesting personal observations making it a fluid read despite being filled to the brim with information However, although I enjoyed that parallels were drawn and scientific findings illustrated with examples from the author s personal experience, it was clear that unsubstantiated assumptions were being sometimes made For examples, it was clear that the author only had observed schoolchildren in the UK when he states that Raynaud s s Fascinating Scientific findings are interspersed with interesting personal observations making it a fluid read despite being filled to the brim with information However, although I enjoyed that parallels were drawn and scientific findings illustrated with examples from the author s personal experience, it was clear that unsubstantiated assumptions were being sometimes made For examples, it was clear that the author only had observed schoolchildren in the UK when he states that Raynaud s syndrome like chilblains is less common in countries with relatively severe winters, likeSweden, than in milder countries such as Britain and Italy, perhaps because the harsher climate ensures that people take better precautions In Britain, for example, schoolchildren play outside in winter and are thus chronically exposed to cold Although I m certain that the first theory is correct in terms of clothing , the deduction that British children playoutside in the winter than Swedish children would make anyone who has been to these countries laugh out loud After having lived for at least 5 years in each of these three countries, I can confidently say that Swedish schoolchildren spend the most time playing outside in the winter and Italian children the least The Swedish saying that there is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing is known to all Swedish children old enough to go to school.As could be expected considering that I bought this bookthan ten years ago, some of the sports nutritional advice is somewhat outdated and newer findings and records are obviously not included Still, I think that almost everyone interested in science will find that this provides an enjoyable, rewarding and fascinating read

  7. Arian says:

    I just wrote a long review for this book and then it got erased so screw it.This book is about a bunch of crazy people who did things before warning labels were invented sometimes in the name of science sometimes just in the spirit of extremism If you want to learn a lot about phsyiological limits how people have pushed them over the years temperature, pressure, oxygen, physical feats, etc give it a look The chapters are pretty independant of one another too which is nice because you can jus I just wrote a long review for this book and then it got erased so screw it.This book is about a bunch of crazy people who did things before warning labels were invented sometimes in the name of science sometimes just in the spirit of extremism If you want to learn a lot about phsyiological limits how people have pushed them over the years temperature, pressure, oxygen, physical feats, etc give it a look The chapters are pretty independant of one another too which is nice because you can just skip to what interests you.Okay now where is that f ing save button

  8. Aytaç Direk says:

    nsan fizyolojisi ve evre ko ullar ba lam nda, okudu um kitaplar aras nda en faydal kitap diyebilirim 47 ya nday m ve v cudum hakk nda nedenini bilmedi im ancak fark nda oldu um pek ok hususu bu kitap sayesinde rendim Benim i in bir rehber kitap niteli inde, bu nedenle hep Kindle mda bulunduraca m.

  9. Alper Koyuncu says:

    Kitap ok ekstrem ko ullar harika bir ekilde zetlemi Ayn zamanda da c l k, dalg l k gibi konularda detayl bir ekilde hangi durumlarda neler yap lmal ve nas l yap lmal olarak ele alm ok sade ve yal n bir dili oldu u i in hi s k lmadan okunabilecek bir kitap.

  10. Kerem says:

    Bazen insana ansiklopedi okuyormus hissi verse de asiri kosullarda insanin sinirlarini detaylica ve kimi zaman hikayelerle bezeyerek anlatan cok degisik bilimsel bir kitap Ozellikle asiri durumlara ilgi duyanlara guzel bir okuma olur.