Graven Images

Graven Images PDF ´ Hardcover
  • Hardcover
  • 128
  • Graven Images
  • Paul Fleischman
  • English
  • 14 September 2019
  • 0763627755

About the Author: Paul Fleischman

Graven Images PDF ´ Hardcover graven free, images book, Graven ImagesGraven Images PDFPaul Fleischman grew up in Santa Monica, California The son of well known children s novelist Sid Fleischman, Paul was in the unique position of having his famous father s books read out loud to him by the author as they were being written This experience continued throughout his childhood Paul followed in his father s footsteps as an author of books for young readers, and in he released the book Graven Images , which was awarded a Newbery Honor citation In , Paul Fleischman came out with Joyful Noise Poems for Two Voices , an unusually unique collection of poetry from the perspective of insects This book was awarded the John Newbery Medal Factoring in Sid Fleischman s win of the John Newbery Medal in for his book The Whipping Boy , Paul and Sid Fleischman became to this day the only father and son authors to both win the John Newbery Medal.


Graven ImagesGraven Images PDF ´ Hardcover graven free, images book, Graven ImagesGraven Images PDFThree graven images a wooden sailor figure from a death ship a copper weather vane depicting St Crispin and a statue commissioned by a ghost effect revelations of murder and romance in three tales for young teens.

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10 thoughts on “Graven Images

  1. Sarah Stevens says:

    I saw this lying about at the library, and the cover and title not to mention the Newberry Honor prompted me to pick it up and give it a try I like the short story format if it is done well, and I think it works for this small collection.All three stories are written in a most classical prose that reminds me of a lot of the books I read growing up In fact, since the book was originally published in 1982, perhaps this style is indicative of the children s literature that was in fashion at th I saw this lying about at the library, and the cover and title not to mention the Newberry Honor prompted me to pick it up and give it a try I like the short story format if it is done well, and I think it works for this small collection.All three stories are written in a most classical prose that reminds me of a lot of the books I read growing up In fact, since the book was originally published in 1982, perhaps this style is indicative of the children s literature that was in fashion at the time Regardless, it is a nice clean prose that works well for the stories.Certain types of plots and writing work best for short stories The first story The Binnacle Boy is a good old fashioned whodunit with a nice freaky twist at the end While the plot and characters could have been spun out into a longer tale, it was fairly artfully done and works as a short story The second is entitled Saint Crispin s Follower and is perfect as a short story in every way Sweet and light hearted, the action moves at the perfect pace for a nice little read.The last story is what causes me to rate this as only four stars The Man of Influence has a lot of potential to be a real soul searching, chilling tale However, the effect falls a little flat because the setup and execution is a roughly handled The main character is too prideful and abrasive for the reader to really relate or sympathize, and the revelations about the figure requesting the statue come too quickly and bluntly to have any deep impact

  2. Christina Packard says:

    I don t understand why this book was picked for an Honor Book for the Newbery Awards The three stories were not bad, but not all that special.

  3. Michael Fitzgerald says:

    Really enjoyed this audiobook The stories were engaging, with great little twists at the end I found Saint Crispin s Follower to be predictable, but the telling was still good An added bonus was the author s note telling about how the book and stories came to be This was not present in the original print book, but the print book of course does have the illustrations by Andrew Glass that are absent from the audiobook I d to readby Fleischman in this vein if such a thing exists.

  4. Tory says:

    Maybe I just timed the book wrong, but it was a little dark for a summer read In the afterword, Fleishman writes, Its length suggested grammar school, but its reading level was higher Very true, and I am sure some people would enjoy the tryptic of statue stories, but it s just the wrong season for me.

  5. Natalie says:

    I really have no strong emotions regarding this little book The stories weren t great, but they weren t bad either They were at least good enough to hold my attention Story 1 Definitely the most sinister creepy This story matched what the cover made me think these stories would all be A ship rolls into port and everyone is dead The boy statue I forget what it s called that holds the compass is brought as a memorial into town and all the townsfolk go spill their secrets to him A deaf g I really have no strong emotions regarding this little book The stories weren t great, but they weren t bad either They were at least good enough to hold my attention Story 1 Definitely the most sinister creepy This story matched what the cover made me think these stories would all be A ship rolls into port and everyone is dead The boy statue I forget what it s called that holds the compass is brought as a memorial into town and all the townsfolk go spill their secrets to him A deaf girl that reads lips discovers something terrifying Story 2 I kept expecting this one to be dark and creepy like the first, but apparently, according to the afterword, it was supposed to be a humorous little tale of misguided romance Since I kept waiting for the dark and creepy thing to happen, I was definitely not reading it in the proper context and didn t find anything funny about it Story 3 A ghost commissions a special statue made of him I suppose it s a bit sinister, but it didn t creep me out like the first one did I m not sure what was special enough about this book that it won a Newberry Honor, but it wasn t awful I admire the way the author built up his stories from scratch and based them all around graven images It s a unique concept, even if it s not one that I particular care about

  6. Elizabeth Meadows says:

    I picked this up because it s a Newbery Honor book It is made up of three short stories Each one features a statue of some sort I had mixed feelings about it It was mysterious and a little bit creepy, but not really creepy enough to satisfy someone who is looking for that and not really enough of a mystery in each story to please a mystery buff Also, my edition features illustrations by Andrew Glass While they are kind of creepy, I m really not a fan of them I did enjoy the book, but it d I picked this up because it s a Newbery Honor book It is made up of three short stories Each one features a statue of some sort I had mixed feelings about it It was mysterious and a little bit creepy, but not really creepy enough to satisfy someone who is looking for that and not really enough of a mystery in each story to please a mystery buff Also, my edition features illustrations by Andrew Glass While they are kind of creepy, I m really not a fan of them I did enjoy the book, but it didn t blow me away

  7. Josiah says:

    Having now read several of Paul Fleischman s books, I think I can safely say that readers should anticipate a high level of innovation from his work Fleischman seems generally resistant to the idea of penning a traditional novel, and the unconventional fruits of his labor have meant some outstanding contributions to the pantheon of contemporary literature In Graven Images, the author links three unrelated short stories together through use of a common theme inanimate objects that, in one wa Having now read several of Paul Fleischman s books, I think I can safely say that readers should anticipate a high level of innovation from his work Fleischman seems generally resistant to the idea of penning a traditional novel, and the unconventional fruits of his labor have meant some outstanding contributions to the pantheon of contemporary literature In Graven Images, the author links three unrelated short stories together through use of a common theme inanimate objects that, in one way or another, exert surprising influence on the world around them, making and breaking people s lives just as surely as if the objects in question had mouths, eyes, and a brain It makes one pause to consider that anything can become a catalyst for destruction in our lives if we re not careful, even something as ostensibly innocuous as a simple graven image In the first short story, a town in mourning for a crew of sailors found dead aboard a ship washed ashore find solace in the unmoving, unspeaking wooden figurehead of the ship Surely this wooden figure saw what happened, though it speaks not of whatever the tragedy may have been The carefully crafted piece of wood eventually draws a bit of a cult following as people come to whisper their deepest, darkest secrets in its unhearing ears, sure that the figure can be trusted to keep their secrets as well as it has kept the secret of whatever happened that killed all of the crew aboard its ship This cathartic practice of telling secrets to a harmless receptor takes on a sinister edge, though, when one of the town s residents figures out a way to learn the secrets being told to the carved wooden form Might the answer to the mystery of the dead crew be found on the lips of someone seeking to unburden his or her soul to the wooden figure In story number two, a young apprentice cobbler finds his life heading in a new direction when he mistakenly interprets a signal given by a girl working in the grocery as meaningful of her love and devotion to him This changes everything, and he immediately goes about trying to find just the right way to express in return the way that he feels about the girl However, figuring out the complicated romantic meanings of different kinds of flowers isn t easy, and so in mild desperation he turns to the patron saint of cobblers for help, hoping that if Saint Crispin wills it, he might find true happiness with this girl after all But is the saint said by many to be responsible for watching over cobblers really the one directing events The final story is that of a statue maker named Zorelli, whose once thriving business has gone south and left him in meager financial straits He ll have to give up his shop entirely before much longer, but his fortunes change when a ghost comes to solicit his work The ghost wants to pay Zorelli a substantial fee to make a statue of him, but the odd requests that the ghost makes as to how he wants the statue to look puzzle Zorelli, and after a while he begins to wonder if perhaps he made a mistake by accepting the job at all There sbehind the ghost s commissioning of the statue than just the chiseling of a personal sculpture, though, and as Zorelli nears the completion of the stone monument, he also arrives closer to learning the truth about what shocking past deed the ghost has committed, and where he received so much money to pay Zorelli in the first place In this edition of Graven Images, with a new afterword added by Paul Fleischman, I actually think that the afterword might be the most interesting part of the book In it, the author gives some great examples of how he comes up with the ideas for his stories, and then allows us a background look into the process by which Graven Images was first dreamed up and compiled, and how much of a difference the steadfast belief of editor Charlotte Zolotow made in getting this book out onto the market That belief of hers would be vindicated in early 1983 when Graven Images was selected as one of five Newbery Honor books that year, putting Paul Fleischman on the map as a promising talent for the future The only other thing I have to say about this book s Newbery connections is that, had it actually gone a step higher and won the Newbery Medal instead of an Honor, then Paul Fleischman would have beaten his father to the big prize despite, obviously, having been a novelist for a much shorter time As it turned out, Sid Fleischman claimed the Newbery Medal first with The Whipping Boy in 1987, but Paul would taste Newbery gold of his own two years later, winning for Joyful Noise Poems for Two Voices in 1989 To date, they remain the only parent and child to have ever both won a Newbery Medal, and that s a distinction that it s quite possible no other pair will ever match Graven Images is a good book, in my opinion not necessarily what I usually think of in a novel recognized by Newbery, but certainly worth reading None of the three stories really jumps out at me as definitely better than the other two, but if I had to designate one as the best it would probably be the second story, Saint Crispin s Flower Fans of Paul Fleischman s esoteric writing style will want to get their hands on a copy of this book, though I might recommend a different starting point for those who are new to his body of literature

  8. Steve Ward says:

    This is a well written book of 3 short tales I liked the first story the best due to a surprise twist at the end All three stories would be considered eerie or mystical in their plot lines I think the author could have made all three longer as they had interesting themes that would have kept most readers intrigued I d recommend this book to readers 10 and older looking for quirky stories.

  9. Tamara York says:

    Newbery Challenge 173 415 This is a collection of 3 short stories, 2 of which have a slightly spooky tone The first story was definitely my favorite because of the twist at the end I feel like there either needed to bestories or the ones included needed to be longer It just felt lacking to me Also, the cover design is not doing this one any favors.

  10. Shanna says:

    The Binnacle Boy When townsfolk begin telling secrets to a statue, a girl who can read lips learns the truth about the mysterious deaths on board a ship Saint Crispin s Follower A shoemaker s apprentice fumbles along trying to get the attentions of a girl The Man of Influence A poor stone carver makes an impulsive deal with a ghost which he later regrets.