Zen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis

Zen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis ePUB ß Zen Buddhism
  • Paperback
  • 188
  • Zen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis
  • Erich Fromm
  • English
  • 11 January 2017
  • 0285647474

About the Author: Erich Fromm

Zen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis ePUB ß Zen Buddhism buddhism kindle, psychoanalysis download, Zen Buddhism book, Zen Buddhism and PsychoanalysisZen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis EpubErich Fromm, PhD Sociology, University of Heidelberg, , was a psychoanalyst and social philosopher who explored the interaction between psychology and society, and held various professorships in psychology in the US and Mexico in the mid th centuryFromm s theory is a rather unique blend Zen Buddhism Epub / of Freud and Marx Freud, of course, emphasized the unconscious, biological drives, repression, and so on In other words, Freud postulated that our characters were determined by biology Marx, on the other hand, saw people as determined by their society, and most especially by their economic systems.


Zen Buddhism and PsychoanalysisZen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis ePUB ß Zen Buddhism buddhism kindle, psychoanalysis download, Zen Buddhism book, Zen Buddhism and PsychoanalysisZen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis EpubZen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis, Erich Fromm, D T Suzuki, and De Martino Approximately one third of this book is a long discussion by Suzuki that gives a Buddhist analysis of the mind, its levels, and the methodology of extending awareness beyond the merely discursive level of Zen Buddhism Epub / thought In producing this analysis, Suzuki gives a theoretical explanation for many of the swordsmanship teaching stories in Zen and Japanese Culture that otherwise would seem to involve mental telepathy, extrasensory perception, etc.

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10 thoughts on “Zen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis

  1. Owlseyes says:

    La clarificaci n anal tica podr a ayudar al estudioso del Zen a evitar ilusiones cuya ausencia es la condicion misma de la iluminacion Erich Fromm I was expecting a kind of dialogue with bridges being made between the two extremes Psychoanalysis and Buddhism Yet, by the end of the book, it was very clear in my mind Susuki almost ruled out any bridges not quite the same with Erich Fromm The book is the output of a seminar held in Cuernavaca, Mexico, in 1957 The first part belongs to La clarificaci n anal tica podr a ayudar al estudioso del Zen a evitar ilusiones cuya ausencia es la condicion misma de la iluminacion Erich Fromm I was expecting a kind of dialogue with bridges being made between the two extremes Psychoanalysis and Buddhism Yet, by the end of the book, it was very clear in my mind Susuki almost ruled out any bridges not quite the same with Erich Fromm The book is the output of a seminar held in Cuernavaca, Mexico, in 1957 The first part belongs to Susuki the second, to Fromm Scott Sensei said once about D.T Susuki he was too an intellectual , viewed from Japan To Scott, Susuki was a well read person, fluent in English, quite familiar with the West writings On a personal level, Scott found Susuki always incredibly natural , putting great emphasis on compassion When I look carefully I see the nazuna bloomingby the hedge Yoku mirebaNazuna hana sakuKakine kana The part belonging to Susuki starts with dichotomy, on poetry He introduces his first part called Orient and Occident with a 17th century poem Basho poetry A simple poem, yet with plenty of subjectivity, flower contemplation, almost passivity And then he proceeds into a poem by Tennyson in which the author has plucked a whole plant as a means to know himself, and muchFlower in the crannied wall,I pluck you out of the crannies Hold you here, root and all, in my hand.Little flower but if I could understand What you are,root and all, and all in allI should know what God and man is Basho accepts Tennyson resists Two very different attitudes towards an object Whereas the westerner talks about the object, describes it, surrounds it, the easterner approaches the object from the inside.While Tennyson dismantles to know, the easterner aims at knowing the flower by becoming it blossoming like it,..enjoying the sun like it Basho, inactive Tennyson, active and analytical You almost conclude these views are irreconcilable Well, the main point of Susaki, I have understood, is that Psychoanalysis being a scientific method, and antireligious, cannot partake of this Buddhist attitude when I do that, the flower talks to me and I know its secrets By knowing it, I know myself The field of absolute subjectivity is where the self abides The Buddhist attitude is pre scientific, meta scientific or even anti scientific It aims at preserving life No surgical tools used Life should be ego less.Science aims at synthetizing formulas and abstractions regarding objects That s not the Buddhist way The only bridge I devised in Susuki s words were these referring to the Unconscious you should feel it It signals the age of innocence Some lines are dedicated to the Koan a problem the master formulates for his disciple to solve Most of times it takes an absurd form, looks incoherent and incomprehensible As I said, affinities and bridges were to be foundon the side of Erich Fromm He d seen at least 3 common features 1 a common ethical orientation 2 the independence of Buddhism and Psychoanalysis regarding any type of authority and finally 3 Psychoanalysis should do the same as when the Buddhist disciple faces the koan, and he cannot use intellectual thought Psychoanalysis should strive to eliminate rationalization Corroborating the ideas of Susuki, that the goal of Zen is satori illumination, Fromm agrees that concept is not convertible, or cannot be expressed intellectually Satori cannot be scientific knowledge Yet, again Fromm tries some bridging speculating the psychoanalytical amplification of consciousness, the awakening , could that be the same experience Zen Buddhists call illumination Fromm s perspective is a very cultural one, starting with his recognition that back then late 1950 s and 1960 it was solid the so called today s spiritual crisis it was evident man had renounced the illusion of a paternal God call it male du si cle or ennui Psychoanalysis was at its height, de repression was on Fromm s agenda Freud s attempt had been to where the Id was should be the Ego turn conscious what is unconscious His method was free association Yet, as Erich From wrote Zen s method was totally different And, as Susuki pointed the way of the Buddha, the way of illumination was doing the good, avoid the evil, purification of man s heart You ll always find that the two fields are really DISTINCT no matter how many bridges you try to build in between no matter what the side at stake, you re on Psychoanalysis or Buddhism couch or cushionThe analytical clarification might help the student of Zen in avoiding illusions, whose absence is the very condition for illumination

  2. Frona says:

    If you can guess that what Zen and Psychoanalysis have in common is their aspiration towards fuller awareness, you might as well pick athorough book However, if all you need is a straightforward introduction to philosophy, orspecifically, a simple sketch of Western and Eastern forms of humanism, this paper can aid you in this task With slow, undemanding progression that underlines the crucial aspects repeatedly, it tells us the familiar story about why all modes of being, without p If you can guess that what Zen and Psychoanalysis have in common is their aspiration towards fuller awareness, you might as well pick athorough book However, if all you need is a straightforward introduction to philosophy, orspecifically, a simple sketch of Western and Eastern forms of humanism, this paper can aid you in this task With slow, undemanding progression that underlines the crucial aspects repeatedly, it tells us the familiar story about why all modes of being, without proper guidance of trained healers, are left in a state of lower consciousness or if one is particularly unlucky, in madness.Though I think the focus on the differences rather than the similarities between these distant forms of thought would make the book muchsubstantial, the author doesn t want to enlarge the gap between them even further and contrasts them only with the aim of moving them closer In therewarding end, the asymmetry finally outshines his aim what psychoanalysis or Western thought lacks is awareness that in order to become a united, fulfilled person doesn t simply mean to dig for one s faults and traumas and make them productive, but a deeper, positive change of personality, where these faults don t need a special treatment, but a general one with the rest of one s traits Fromm s vision of psychoanalysis being the basis for further Zen trainings seems a bit far fetched in this regard, since Zen s interpretations of human s shortcomings are entirely different

  3. Evan Micheals says:

    This book was definitely of its time published in 1974 given that a lot of contemporary psychologists are reclaiming what is good about the Western Traditions I thought Fromm lionised Eastern Philosophy and degenerates Western Tradition materialism and objectification His description of the results of psychoanalysis an altered state of consciousness is almost psychedelic I believe psychedelics were popular at the time.Fromm describes an idealised Eastern Esoteric Utopia of thought Thi This book was definitely of its time published in 1974 given that a lot of contemporary psychologists are reclaiming what is good about the Western Traditions I thought Fromm lionised Eastern Philosophy and degenerates Western Tradition materialism and objectification His description of the results of psychoanalysis an altered state of consciousness is almost psychedelic I believe psychedelics were popular at the time.Fromm describes an idealised Eastern Esoteric Utopia of thought This was likely much easier to do when the East wasexotic, and less known in the West As we now know not every Eastern person is a good Buddhist, Confucianist, or Taoist not even close to the majority , just as every Western person is not a good Christian, Jew, or Secularist nor even close to the majority Fromm idolises Zen and Zen Masters in the same way we used to idolise Martial Arts Masters The testing environment of the UFC has shown that acosmopolitan outlook is most effective in mixed martial arts or in Bruce Lee s words, the style of no style I am sure the same cosmopolitan outlook is can be most successful in Psychotherapy, where a number of different experts can teach you a little, and you fuse them into your own style.Fromm shows how language is important in thought how can we think things we have no words for , this is timeless As I learn and work towards becoming a Psychotherapist this was not wasted, and I plan to spendtime on Fromm s work I choose this because it was mercifully short I found a lot wrong and dated within the book, butthan enough that is timeless to recommend it

  4. Adil says:

    This is a review of a Turkish edition and might be different in that it only includes the writing of Erich Fromm and not of Suzuki or others Erich Fromm was ahead of his time in some ways in pioneering the cross talk of Psychoanalysis and Zen One encounters writings on this intersection muchin modern times 21st century , after Zen has settled in the U.S So Fromm s vision here was cutting edge at his time He writes in a mostly non technical way His aim is to emphasize what is usefu This is a review of a Turkish edition and might be different in that it only includes the writing of Erich Fromm and not of Suzuki or others Erich Fromm was ahead of his time in some ways in pioneering the cross talk of Psychoanalysis and Zen One encounters writings on this intersection muchin modern times 21st century , after Zen has settled in the U.S So Fromm s vision here was cutting edge at his time He writes in a mostly non technical way His aim is to emphasize what is useful in Freud s original ideas, take the good stuff from psychoanalysis, and explore how it maps onto and can be enriched by Zen Buddhism It turns out that Zen and Psychoanalysis sharethan might be obvious to the lay person at first glance Fromm claims that Freud might have had a deeper aim that even he himself had trouble becoming aware of, let alone verbalizing, that ties into the core aim of Zen Thus, Psychoanalysis, at least in theory, is muchthan the treatment of neurosis So what is the deeper potential of Psychoanalysis and how is it similar to and different from Zen The book gives you a good idea

  5. Hamêd says:

    According to Eric Fromm, parallels can be drawn between psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism in that both of them concern with the liberation of man The aim of psychoanalysis is to make the unconscious conscious That is, to enlarge the domain of consciousness and free oneself from the chains of fictitious mental content Similarly, the goal of Zen Buddhism is to grasp one s being and pave the way for attaining enlightenment It is a way of relating to one s being To put it another way, both psyc According to Eric Fromm, parallels can be drawn between psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism in that both of them concern with the liberation of man The aim of psychoanalysis is to make the unconscious conscious That is, to enlarge the domain of consciousness and free oneself from the chains of fictitious mental content Similarly, the goal of Zen Buddhism is to grasp one s being and pave the way for attaining enlightenment It is a way of relating to one s being To put it another way, both psychoanalysis and Zen try to achieve freedom through understanding the truth Being a renown psychoanalyst and social psychologist, Fromm writes with authority about psychoanalysis in this book He emphasizes the social dimension of the unconscious He holds that social norms are, to a large extent, responsible for determining the content of consciousness and which facts are allowed to enter the realm of awareness Thus, knowing social structures that condition man in a specific society is necessary to deepen one s consciousness In fact actualizing one s being is not possible without broadening one s awareness Broadening awareness is a life long project by which man transcends tribalism, overcomes identifying merely with his group, and moves toward Universalism and becoming a citizen of the universe For these lofty aims, both Zen Buddhism and psychoanalysis are of great help

  6. Shane Avery says:

    It s hard to sum this one up It s my first foray into Zen, and I m very glad of it The book consists of a collection of lectures given by Drs D.T Suzuki, who introduced Zen Buddhism to the West with a series of books in the 1950s, and Erich Fromm, one of the most important social psychologists of the twentieth century Suzuki outlines the basic precepts of Zen thought though even the term thought becomes problematic in this sense The Zen man woman is not concerned with thought, but with It s hard to sum this one up It s my first foray into Zen, and I m very glad of it The book consists of a collection of lectures given by Drs D.T Suzuki, who introduced Zen Buddhism to the West with a series of books in the 1950s, and Erich Fromm, one of the most important social psychologists of the twentieth century Suzuki outlines the basic precepts of Zen thought though even the term thought becomes problematic in this sense The Zen man woman is not concerned with thought, but with being and living and experiencing as opposed to awareness, intellect, and cerebration Fromm is interested in relating Zen principles to the practise of psychoanalysis Zen Buddhism is all about cultivating the art of living Psychoanalysis ought to be about that, too, according to Fromm Psychoanalysis ought to concern itself not with curing symptoms, but with encouraging and defining the totality of the human experience Most symptoms associated with mental illness are not the root of one s problem, but simply manifestations of deeper emotional maladjustment This maladjustment might be defined as the complete alienation of one from his or her true Self, alienation of one s Self from others, and one s Self from Nature The goal of psychology ought to be humanistic, as opposed to the mainstream orthodox aim to arrive at the therapeutic adjustment of the patient The standards of a given society may or may not be healthy, in terms of human values Buddhism is concerned with Enlightenment, and psychology with de repression, both of which really aim at the same thing the overcoming of greed in all forms, whether it is greed for possession, for fame, or for affection a cure in this sense implies overcoming narcissistic self glorification and the illusion of omnipotence It implies, further, the overcoming of the desire to submit to an authority who solves one s own problem of existence The person who wants to use Enlightenment, or de repression to simply cure a sickness will never achieve either Psychology thus needs to liberate itself from any contemporary social pathologies by adopting a technique and philosophy of ethics conducive to a truly healthy way of life.Very highly recommended to anyone interested in cultivating the art of living While this particular book might be a bit hard to get a hold of, Suzuki is widely available, as is Fromm I d be happy to recommend titles to anyone interested

  7. Serguei Filimonov says:

    There s a lot of interesting bits, points, phrases, questions in this one I don t know if I understood entirely all of the book, so I can t quite review it, but for whoever comes across this, these connections to other media maybe be of use Without explicit mention, parts of the book strongly reminded me of Science and Sanity ideas by Alfred Korzybski It s remarkable that, coincidentally, the wikipedia article on Sanity mentions both Fromm and Korzybski There s a lot of interesting bits, points, phrases, questions in this one I don t know if I understood entirely all of the book, so I can t quite review it, but for whoever comes across this, these connections to other media maybe be of use Without explicit mention, parts of the book strongly reminded me of Science and Sanity ideas by Alfred Korzybski It s remarkable that, coincidentally, the wikipedia article on Sanity mentions both Fromm and Korzybski The connection is strong in the discussion of language as a filter map model and the connection between sanity in aelaborated sense and well being happiness, if you will Parts of the book have a The Matrix feel to it, in its discussion of society s illusions delusions and the radicalness of the truth and breaking free So if you re a fan of that kind of stuff, this is nice Alan Watts book Way of Zen comes to mind, in connection to the therapeutic effect of Zen teaching on a hypotheical typical person, that s been stressed deadend dulled by whatever opposite of Zen attitude is I recall, in Watt s book there s a remark that the way of life necessary to make an orderly society function, by it s nature is de humanizing the individual and their well being and experience.Yet still, difficult to summarize, don t take the above links as all there is to this book

  8. Francis Djabri says:

    Another excellent book by Erich Fromm To me, this was a book about metaphors The metaphor of the mind that we inherited from Freud was of the Super Ego, Ego and the Id, with the aim to strengthen the Ego from the animalistic instincts of the Id and the s of the Super Ego In this view, the unconscious is not to be trusted it must be revealed, and in this revealing the Ego is liberated In contrast, Fromm argues that both Zen and Humanistic Psychology see the conscious mind as being the p Another excellent book by Erich Fromm To me, this was a book about metaphors The metaphor of the mind that we inherited from Freud was of the Super Ego, Ego and the Id, with the aim to strengthen the Ego from the animalistic instincts of the Id and the s of the Super Ego In this view, the unconscious is not to be trusted it must be revealed, and in this revealing the Ego is liberated In contrast, Fromm argues that both Zen and Humanistic Psychology see the conscious mind as being the problem The conscious mind has hopelessly been infected with stories and ideologies from the prevailing culture, and this is what prevents us from seeing truth The unconscious must still be uncovered, but the unconscious is seen as a wellspring from which auniversal and unalienated person may arise Whereas Zen and humanistic psychology may share the same goals of awakening, the differences lie in the methods and, maddeningly, Fromm leaves us short on detail here

  9. Evan says:

    Whatever comparisons Fromm intended to make between psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism are shrouded beneath a lengthy summarization of the former and but a few glancing references to the latter The vast majority of the text was spent discussing the conscious and subconscious and how they were addressed by Freud and others, the true intentions of psychoanalysis as a field of medicine, and other background information with Zen mentioned only as a passing segue to the next topic It isn t until the Whatever comparisons Fromm intended to make between psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism are shrouded beneath a lengthy summarization of the former and but a few glancing references to the latter The vast majority of the text was spent discussing the conscious and subconscious and how they were addressed by Freud and others, the true intentions of psychoanalysis as a field of medicine, and other background information with Zen mentioned only as a passing segue to the next topic It isn t until the last several pages, and ultimately the last page itself, that any tangible comparison between the two fields is made by which point my subconscious was jumping for joy as I consciously closed the book

  10. Rob Hermanowski says:

    Erich Fromm was a master psychoanalyst whose interest in Zen Buddhism inspired both a seminar and this book on the intersections of the two fields Since I have done a fair amount of reading in both disciplines, I found the promise of this book connecting the two to be very enticing Fromm certainly does make some interesting observations, although I didn t always find his arguments to be as compelling as I thought they could have been Still, this was a worthwhile, short audiobook experience, a Erich Fromm was a master psychoanalyst whose interest in Zen Buddhism inspired both a seminar and this book on the intersections of the two fields Since I have done a fair amount of reading in both disciplines, I found the promise of this book connecting the two to be very enticing Fromm certainly does make some interesting observations, although I didn t always find his arguments to be as compelling as I thought they could have been Still, this was a worthwhile, short audiobook experience, and narrator Clair Slemmer s straightforward and very professional approach to the material works well