Demons by Daylight (Star Horror)

Demons by Daylight PDF/EPUB ´ Demons by  Kindle -
  • Paperback
  • 192
  • Demons by Daylight (Star Horror)
  • Ramsey Campbell
  • English
  • 14 February 2017
  • 0352300647

About the Author: Ramsey Campbell

Demons by Daylight PDF/EPUB ´ Demons by Kindle - demons mobile, daylight book, star mobile, horror book, Demons by epub, Demons by Daylight (Star Horror)Demons by Daylight PDF/EPUBRamsey Campbell is a British writer considered by a number of critics to be one of the great masters of horror fiction T E D Klein has written that Campbell reigns supreme in the field today, while S T Joshi has said that future generations will regard him as the leading horror writer of our generation, every bit the equal of Lovecraft or Blackwood.


Demons by Daylight (Star Horror)Demons by Daylight PDF/EPUB ´ Demons by Kindle - demons mobile, daylight book, star mobile, horror book, Demons by epub, Demons by Daylight (Star Horror)Demons by Daylight PDF/EPUBPotential Severn ValleyThe End of a Summer s DayAt First SightThe Franklyn Paragraphs Severn ValleyThe InterloperThe SentinelsThe GuyThe Old HornsThe LostThe StockingThe Second StaircaseConcussionThe Enchanted FruitMade in Goatswood Severn Valley.

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10 thoughts on “Demons by Daylight (Star Horror)

  1. Lisa says:

    This is a good one I ve had it since the 1980 s, and it s survived all my book scourges I can t recall a damn thing about any of the stories Nothing But, again it survived all the scourges The biggest and most heartbreaking scourge was in 2010 That s the year I got rid of over 2000 books Sure, I still have a few thousand, but. Yet, somehow, I have kept this, and all Campbell s books He is that good If you had only seen all those popular author s that I gave away, just to keep Campbell This is a good one I ve had it since the 1980 s, and it s survived all my book scourges I can t recall a damn thing about any of the stories Nothing But, again it survived all the scourges The biggest and most heartbreaking scourge was in 2010 That s the year I got rid of over 2000 books Sure, I still have a few thousand, but. Yet, somehow, I have kept this, and all Campbell s books He is that good If you had only seen all those popular author s that I gave away, just to keep Campbell I once loved how his stories pulsed with menace Now I m 56, and have no patience Not Mr Campbell s fault Just mine Time..It s ticking away from me

  2. Janie C. says:

    This collection of horror stories has its own singular style and sense of atmosphere Each story is darkly enchanting and finely written Some stories are stronger andfully realized than others, though all are cloaked in a sense of portentousness Denouements are not always revealed as solid events, but are hinted at through occurrences with suggestible endings The author creates environments that can be seen in detail by the mind s eye and are as tactile as the book we hold in our hands This collection of horror stories has its own singular style and sense of atmosphere Each story is darkly enchanting and finely written Some stories are stronger andfully realized than others, though all are cloaked in a sense of portentousness Denouements are not always revealed as solid events, but are hinted at through occurrences with suggestible endings The author creates environments that can be seen in detail by the mind s eye and are as tactile as the book we hold in our hands Religious beliefs are challenged by a hostile universe, and nature is alluring in its menace Psychological themes become hallucinatory as memory chases time in hallucinatory ripples I felt myself in other worlds while between the covers of this collection, and will be sure to seek out muchof Ramsey Campbell s work

  3. Simon says:

    My first introduction to the work of Ramsey Campbell was, I have to say, quite a shock He s not going to be for everyone, that s for sure What you have here are not coherent stories relayed in a conventional manner and the horror is not conventionally scary His stories areoblique and scary insubtle ways They seem to getcryptic as the collection progresses The number of stories I feel I fully got my head around were definitely in the minority.On top of that is his sparce, j My first introduction to the work of Ramsey Campbell was, I have to say, quite a shock He s not going to be for everyone, that s for sure What you have here are not coherent stories relayed in a conventional manner and the horror is not conventionally scary His stories areoblique and scary insubtle ways They seem to getcryptic as the collection progresses The number of stories I feel I fully got my head around were definitely in the minority.On top of that is his sparce, jagged prose that has to be read to be believed Imagine the converse of Lovecraft who gave obsessive attention to detail, Campbell on the other hand, is concerned with only imagery and atmoshpere Imagine watching a movie which is a sequence of still images fading in and out on screen every few seconds, each conveying a key scene or plot development Campbells stories read a bit like that Thus the narrative and dialog can be confusing and require careful reading However the imagery is wonderfully evokative, powerfully conveying the sense of unease and atmosphere Reading campbell is not a passive affair, he does not spell everything out, forcing the reader to make deductions and draw inferences in order to make sense of the plot In addition, the sparce prose requires the use of imagination to fill in the gaps This will either be a positive or negative depending on what you want from a book Those who like a little subtlety in their horror will like what they find here, especially if you they prepared to actively engage with the stories Those who arepassive readers, who prefer to have things spelled out and the horror in your face will probably not like this at all

  4. Bill Hsu says:

    Dec 2019 revisiting some old pieces.The section Errol Undercliffe a tribute contains two stories The Franklyn Paragraphs seems to be one of Campbell s least collected pieces I vaguely remember enjoying it decades ago, so am curious why it s not in for example the Tor edition of Cold Print, or the omnibus Alone with the Horrors The lost books vanished writers trope is pretty well worn by now, but this was an early 70s take, solidly situated in its time Campbell slaps on an extra lev Dec 2019 revisiting some old pieces.The section Errol Undercliffe a tribute contains two stories The Franklyn Paragraphs seems to be one of Campbell s least collected pieces I vaguely remember enjoying it decades ago, so am curious why it s not in for example the Tor edition of Cold Print, or the omnibus Alone with the Horrors The lost books vanished writers trope is pretty well worn by now, but this was an early 70s take, solidly situated in its time Campbell slaps on an extra level of indirection the narrator is himself, complete with titles of Lovecraftian tales, who is looking into the disappearance of his correspondent and fellow writer Errol Undercliffe, who in turn is investigating the vanished writer Roland Franklyn Lots of writerly in jokes and namedropping Pursewarden apparently a Lawrence Durrell character , Sebastien Knight ha and the by now overused Robert Blake It s briskly executed, with a sly ending whether you enjoy it or not will depend on how tired you are of these riffs.The other piece in the same section, The Interloper by Errol Undercliffe , didn t make much of an impression on me.Similarly, I ve been disappointed with thecelebrated stories The Guy , The End of a Summer s Day , The Old Horns etc Maybe even my vague memories were enough to diminish their effectiveness after all they re quite short I actually did enjoy Potential , which I don t remember at all It follows a familiar pattern guy goes to a lame hippy party, feels out of place, gets talked into going to another, darker event, where weird things happen Lovecraft is namedropped twice, but none of the supernatural entities or books And we get a brief mention of Penderecki s Threnody, ha The ending is actually quite surprising, with a somewhat Lovecraftian twist

  5. Die Booth says:

    I found this collection very hit and miss Ramsey Campbell certainly doesn t belong to the slasher generation of horror writers who rely on gore and shock to get their message across, his is an entirelysubtle kind of horror Even as fond as I am of a vague sense of unease I did find this collection slightly too subtle It s undeniable that Campbell is very adept at creating atmosphere and that s what carries this collection through There s a lot of beautifully written and surprising d I found this collection very hit and miss Ramsey Campbell certainly doesn t belong to the slasher generation of horror writers who rely on gore and shock to get their message across, his is an entirelysubtle kind of horror Even as fond as I am of a vague sense of unease I did find this collection slightly too subtle It s undeniable that Campbell is very adept at creating atmosphere and that s what carries this collection through There s a lot of beautifully written and surprising description, such as The trees had trapped the twilight The branches which the sun had dappled were brown stains on the shadows leaves moved like hives of darkness Other descriptive passages however fall a little flat as a whole this collection occasionally come across as rather over described and lacking in coherant story.Narrative tends to jump from one scene to another with confusing rapidity New characters are introduced frequently with little explanation The reader is left with the feeling of not having read a single full story but rather a series of gently disturbing vignettes that present a weird and grainy snapshot of 1970s Britain.The stand out stories are the ones that have acoherant and less rambling narrative, such as The Sentinels which I found genuinely unsettling However other stories, I think notably The Stocking and The Second Staircase , are far too opaque

  6. Armand Rosamilia says:

    As with any collection, there are some great stories and some average ones Luckily this collection has manygreat ones in it None of them are bad, although it was hard to follow a few because of my decidedly non British upbringing and having to figure out a few words here and there I don t think I m an idiot, but the author is so much smarter than me it feels like it, haha

  7. Andy says:

    I ve been dipping into this book since April, so I really took my time finishing it Returning to this book was always a treat however, and rarely did I find a story here I didn t like.Campbell got away from the Lovecraftian influence in this book, and really wrote some insidious, menacing stories which are subtle and get under the skin Potential is a very weird story, the end didn t make complete sense to me however The End of a Summer s Day didn t exactly scare me the first time I read it, I ve been dipping into this book since April, so I really took my time finishing it Returning to this book was always a treat however, and rarely did I find a story here I didn t like.Campbell got away from the Lovecraftian influence in this book, and really wrote some insidious, menacing stories which are subtle and get under the skin Potential is a very weird story, the end didn t make complete sense to me however The End of a Summer s Day didn t exactly scare me the first time I read it, however it took some time to germinate A few days later, laying in bed thinking about it I know I lost some sleep over that one At First Sight is effectively scary at many points, but especially at the end The Franklyn Paragraphs is a story I read in the Cold Print collection some time ago, all I recall is it was well written, Lovecraftian perhaps but not overly creepy The Interloper isn t the best written story, feels a bitrushed but it s definitely one of the ones that creeped me out the most The Sentinels has a good, quiet creepiness about it, atmospheric but not among his best The Guy is a nice weird tale, creepy ending but not among the best in the collection The Old Horns has a nice pagan, Machen esque feel to it, creepy but doesn t always make a lot of sense The Lost is one of the few stories I didn t care for at all The Stocking has a good atmosphere and shocker ending, but is another lesser tale The Second Staircase is OK, but another lesser story where the first half feels like filler for the second This one embodies Campbell s hallucinogenic feel Concussion is perhaps the best example of Campbells hallucinogenic stories, it takes a riff on a familiar but non scary horror sci fi theme of time slips The Enchanted Fruithallucinogenic writing, not among my favorites, but it does have a good sense of urban anxiety and dread Made in Goatswood is a story I read years ago in the Cold Print collection, good Lovecraftian fare

  8. Bryan Alexander says:

    Ramsey Campbell is one of the best known and important horror writers of the past 50 years He s known for crafting a certain kind of tale quiet and understated, laced with dread, set in British towns and cities of varying degrees of decline and bitterness He s also a very gracious and thoughtful person, based on the several occasions I ve met and heard him.I grabbed this collection on a Kindle sale I think I have a copy, but my horror books are still in storage which is a daily horror not a Ramsey Campbell is one of the best known and important horror writers of the past 50 years He s known for crafting a certain kind of tale quiet and understated, laced with dread, set in British towns and cities of varying degrees of decline and bitterness He s also a very gracious and thoughtful person, based on the several occasions I ve met and heard him.I grabbed this collection on a Kindle sale I think I have a copy, but my horror books are still in storage which is a daily horror not at all enjoyable Demons by Daylight is a short story collection from the 1970s, and some of the tales really date clearly from that period My favorite one, Potential, is among other things a snarling satire on contemporary Newage movements.Campbell has a fine knack for brief, creepy metaphors and similes that spike each story with moments of dread not as plot points, but as texture Read carefully, they heighten a sense of unease They are also excellent visualizations For example The moon fought back the clouds, like an awakening face An old man picked up papers from the platform, studied, them, dropped them muttering Carol stared into the tunnel, where trains thrust and vanished like huge mysterious worms He plunged beneath the shadow of the long Pier Head bus station hall, pale as the bore of a blown bone Campbell slides these into otherwise non horrific language describing scenes Barbara thought of Sentinel Hill They d driven past at dusk on their way to the pub the sloughed stone faces mobile with shadow a few cars, uniformly grey, from which their passengers had climbed to count the stones and count again and descend baffled a child at the centre of the circle prancing awkwardly and, as she d slowed to let Doug watch, turning to her a cardboard demon s face At times such language recalls noir and crime fiction a bluebottle was patting its reflexion on the window, trying to escape On waste ground at the edge of Lower Brichester a gutted bonfire smouldered Children stood about it, shaking sparklers as a dog shakes a rat Through the posts I turned into the forest the moon was caught by reaching twigs and dragged down There is a horror at daily life in much of Campbell s work, a disgust at sensual details and something close to existential nausea or plain outrage at the condition of experience One story begins thusly The man behind the counter of the curiosity shop wore a cloth cap when he bent his head Terry Aldrich felt he was being served by a toad The man s hands were brown and crinkled as the paper in which he wrapped the parcels The paper flapped dust billowed round the shop, passing like incense across the window through which the summer sun was dulled as by sunglasses, changing form and leaving particles on clasped leather bound books, carved vases, ornamental knives, a naked wooden boy frozen in the act of crying praises to the sun or possibly of beating off an attack from above The hands set the parcel before Terry he thought that the dim eyes gleamed in derision Briefly his hand was clasped by fingers drier than the notes he paid I think this style is the real strength of much of Campbell s fiction I don t want to summarize the plots here, because they can be fairly slight a group of people visit a scary place and bad things happen and predictable These are gems of mood, draughts of dread to sample.This time, I d recommend the stories about horror writers, Errol Undercliffe and The Franklyn Paragraphs They offer a nice insider s glimpse into the genre, showing a mix of satire and affection The Guy looks like a piece about class differences then wrong foots us The Lost starts with a classic Brits visiting the creepy continent plot and nicely reverses.I did want to like Concussion because I ve suffered three of my own oh yes , and because the drifting plot was impressive, but it dragged on too long for a short story Potential remains my favorite It s remarkably compressed It begins with a hippie Newage scene, then escalates into something much greater The last pages are excellent, reminding me of Thomas Ligotti

  9. Zantaeus Glom says:

    I enjoyed most of these stories immensely, and Campbell writes with a bravura, oblique style which at best engenders a cloying,unsavory atmosphere but sometimes I did find myself a little alienated by his idiosyncratic style of prose no fault of Campbell s artistry, just personal taste My favorites were The end of a summer s day A brief, yet wonderfully unsettling nightmare The Franklyn Paragraphs This made the collection for me truly sublime weird fiction in the classic Lovecraft, I enjoyed most of these stories immensely, and Campbell writes with a bravura, oblique style which at best engenders a cloying,unsavory atmosphere but sometimes I did find myself a little alienated by his idiosyncratic style of prose no fault of Campbell s artistry, just personal taste My favorites were The end of a summer s day A brief, yet wonderfully unsettling nightmare The Franklyn Paragraphs This made the collection for me truly sublime weird fiction in the classic Lovecraft, Ashton Smith vernacular There is a macabre passage where the main fellow visits this extraordinarily unpleasant domicile, and meets this dusty old maid, who is quite the character a beautifully written vignette The Old Horns This grimpen tale reminded me a little of Algernon Blackwood with nature itself as nemesis in this specific case, a wholly malefic bog, which is home to these singularly nasty sounding, blobby headed wraiths shudder a sublime tale of phantasmagorical weirdness with some wonderfully evocative passages I think I will dip into Campbell s eloquent, sepulchral grimoire every now and again, but I won t read the short stories all in one sitting next time I will savor them like one would a wee dram of an especially complex single malt as I feel they would work best when enjoyed sparingly as they lost a little of their refinement consumed so hurriedly Ramsey Campbell is one of those rare contemporary artists who can readily evoke an authentically macabre Gothic milieu along with the likes of the legendary Poe, Blackwood, and M.R James And I would be very surprised indeed if any fan of elegiac, weird fiction didn t find their nerves iced by at least one of Campbell s splendidly malignant treats

  10. Jim Smith says:

    My favourite Campbell collection and among the essentials of modern horror s development Ingeniously supple prose and subtlety of narration.