A Sense of Reality: And Other Stories

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  • A Sense of Reality: And Other Stories
  • Graham Greene
  • English
  • 02 January 2019
  • 080723169X

About the Author: Graham Greene

A Sense of Reality: And Other Stories ePUB ´ Sense of sense kindle, reality: book, other pdf, stories ebok, A Sense kindle, of Reality: free, A Sense of Reality: And Other StoriesSense of Reality: epub, Sense of Reality: And Other ebok, A Sense of Reality: And Other Stories PDF/EPUBHenry Graham Greene, OM, of Reality: PDF/EPUB è CH was an English novelist, short story writer, A Sense ePUB ´ playwright, screenplay writer, travel writer and critic whose works explore the ambivalent moral Sense of Reality: Kindle Ó and political issues of the modern world Greene combined serious literary acclaim with wide popularityAlthough Greene objected strongly to being described as a Catholic novelist rather than as a novelist who happened to be Catholic, Catholic religious themes are at the root of much of his writing, especially the four major Catholic novels Brighton Rock, The Heart of the Matter, The End of the Affair, and The Power and the Glory Works such as The Quiet American, Our Man in Havana and The Human Factor also show an avid interest in the workings of international politics and espionage Excerpted from Wikipedia.


A Sense of Reality: And Other StoriesA Sense of Reality: And Other Stories ePUB ´ Sense of sense kindle, reality: book, other pdf, stories ebok, A Sense kindle, of Reality: free, A Sense of Reality: And Other StoriesSense of Reality: epub, Sense of Reality: And Other ebok, A Sense of Reality: And Other Stories PDF/EPUBA collection that captures of Reality: PDF/EPUB è a wealth of the writer s diverse themes.

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10 thoughts on “A Sense of Reality: And Other Stories

  1. Daren says:

    This book collects four fiction short stories from Graham Greene Under the Garden I have read a couple of times in both a Penguin 60 and in Shades of Greene, which collects the Greene stories that Thames TV dramatised in a series The P60 review describes the story A Visit to Morin Set in Germany a man meets a once famous Catholic author who made an impact on his childhood through his writing Their discussion, late one night after midnight mass, doesn t go the way expected Very religion b This book collects four fiction short stories from Graham Greene Under the Garden I have read a couple of times in both a Penguin 60 and in Shades of Greene, which collects the Greene stories that Thames TV dramatised in a series The P60 review describes the story A Visit to Morin Set in Germany a man meets a once famous Catholic author who made an impact on his childhood through his writing Their discussion, late one night after midnight mass, doesn t go the way expected Very religion based this one, and not really in my wheelhouse Dream of a Strange Land, which again was featured in Shades of Greene This story is about a doctor who find himself with two dilemmas whether to compromise the law for a poor patient with leprosy, or for a powerful General A Discovery in the Woods Again a short story that might have been developed into something , has something in common with Under the Garden In this case it appears to be set in the post apocalyptic future, where a group of deformed children explore beyond the bounds of their village and discover a large house full of artifacts I think the four star reviews outweigh the other, as I enjoyed itthan 3 stars

  2. Smiley says:

    4.5 starsThis was a 4 novella brownish, 1986 reprinted pocketbook by Graham Greene unexpectedly found one Sunday two weeks ago at the Booklovers secondhand bookshop on Soi Rambutri, Banglampoo, Bangkok I think it is the second best after the Dasa Book Cafe on Sukhumvit Road.There are four stories all together, namely Under the Garden, A Visit to Morin, Dream of a Strange Land, and A Discovery in the Woods While reading him once again and some of his 4.5 starsThis was a 4 novella brownish, 1986 reprinted pocketbook by Graham Greene unexpectedly found one Sunday two weeks ago at the Booklovers secondhand bookshop on Soi Rambutri, Banglampoo, Bangkok I think it is the second best after the Dasa Book Cafe on Sukhumvit Road.There are four stories all together, namely Under the Garden, A Visit to Morin, Dream of a Strange Land, and A Discovery in the Woods While reading him once again and some of his unread works, for example, England Made Me , I couldn t help thinking these were typical Greene, that is, lengthy narratives with unusual words here and there, fearless use of grammar as well as lively, unique dialogues therefore, I preferred A Visit to Morin to the other three due to the following points 1 Its title is literally mischievous, Morin is a protagonist, not a destination.2 I think his grammar in this sentence is typically daring They were not the kind of help I needed, nor was the chaplain the man to give it me p 71 3 A notable use and unique position of preposition He looked quickly, and I thought defensively, up p 72 To continue

  3. Wreade1872 says:

    This novella consists of 4 tales, one of which takes up half the book then 3 shorts ones Each is surprisingly unique You d be hard pressed to imagine they were written by the same author Each i guess has something to say about how we perceive the world around us hence the title of the collection but its a very tenuous connection.The long tale is about a man who revisits his childhood home and tries to remember a strange incident that happened when he was young Its like a Roald Dahl story f This novella consists of 4 tales, one of which takes up half the book then 3 shorts ones Each is surprisingly unique You d be hard pressed to imagine they were written by the same author Each i guess has something to say about how we perceive the world around us hence the title of the collection but its a very tenuous connection.The long tale is about a man who revisits his childhood home and tries to remember a strange incident that happened when he was young Its like a Roald Dahl story for adults, pretty twisted but good Each of the others has something to say about faith or perception but is wildly different in location and characters.I don t process short stories as easily as long ones, so i wouldn t buy something like this but a very interesting borrow from the library, and i look forward to checking out some of Greene s other works

  4. Melanti says:

    A small collection of just 4 short stories Oddly enough, only one of the four reminded me of Greene s typical writing He was evidently really experimental in his short fiction, which bodes well for the other collections of his I ve picked up He even got in on the post apocalyptic craze of the 60 s The first story about the possible dream was my favorite, though.

  5. Dane Cobain says:

    This book is essentially a mini short story collection from one of my favourite authors, bringing together four different pieces Under the Garden, A Visit to Morin, Dream of a Strange Land and A Discovery in the Woods.What s cool here is that they don t feel like typical Greene stories, although there are a few little references to Catholicism and the church I particularly enjoyed Under the Garden, possibly because it takes up over half of the book, although each of the stories were strong, un This book is essentially a mini short story collection from one of my favourite authors, bringing together four different pieces Under the Garden, A Visit to Morin, Dream of a Strange Land and A Discovery in the Woods.What s cool here is that they don t feel like typical Greene stories, although there are a few little references to Catholicism and the church I particularly enjoyed Under the Garden, possibly because it takes up over half of the book, although each of the stories were strong, unusually so Worth reading

  6. A.E. Reiff says:

    Whenever I read this book I have an uncanny sense of reliving buried past shadow events as unlikely as this narrator s Those raw, untempered provocative things are dreams of an underworld savage if brought into day In the urbane surface texture here, as I read Under the Garden I admire the care he takes of me with little metaphors, x rays as maps, doctor s reports as bombing runs, intelligence, and all the while he says how it couldn t have happened the way he remembers it In reading I reme Whenever I read this book I have an uncanny sense of reliving buried past shadow events as unlikely as this narrator s Those raw, untempered provocative things are dreams of an underworld savage if brought into day In the urbane surface texture here, as I read Under the Garden I admire the care he takes of me with little metaphors, x rays as maps, doctor s reports as bombing runs, intelligence, and all the while he says how it couldn t have happened the way he remembers it In reading I remember along and above the text on the page of my own mind where projections and correspondances play out cinematically If I try to capture one in writing the whole castle disappears Like he says dreams are bigger than the eye This isthan evocation When I read reviews looking for validation of my experience it seems nobody got that It s like T H White s Book of Merlin in this, the line of the imagination goes so far down into the lunar mount as to run off the hand Charles Williams evokes such impressions where the young bride opens the book standing dead in All Hallows Eve, a spirit on the bridge Caves and spirits, Orpheus and Cerberus, subtexts done to others as they done Epitaph of a Small Winner is totally different from this even if resembling on the surface, that is, a man writing his life after his death No dream states at all, but a way to retell the fictional life Whether this is fiction or religion is at issue, as if the Celtic immram could be turned into Tarot, which of course they have.That s got to be what appeals in the subterranean passages of Tolkien s evocation of the dark But what s to say that Sterne s Tristram in telling about his birth before birth is any different from the telling of death after death Or in this case that the dream, being the thing that connects the totality of things, isn t our prison that we wake up from in the day Kwang tze says those whose flesh and skin are smooth as ice and white as snow I,i , confront this bodily sense, that when we sleep the soul communicates with what is external to us when we wake the body is set free Legge, I, 178 A Sense of Reality evokes daylight as a respite imagination So in Under the Garden the old man who looks like a carrier pigeon says, we are deeper here than any grave was ever dug to bury secrets in Under the earth or over the earth, it s there you ll find all that matters 30 And to cut to the bottom it s the ancestors, who went before who live in our brains if we recognize them there That s why I m to go to North China to teach, I will meet up with Zhuangzi, but what will we say It is enough to stop.Necronauts or necrophants The capital persons who arbitrate taste say necronauts, fictionauts They kid about the grave, like Yeats, and have their hands mashed in the frozen mat of Lucifer s shag in Dante s hell Death is their dominion but the death boats sailed before Come back to tell you all Hades, which was once thought America, where the dead live, oxymoron that, is domiciled in imagination at the foot of the lunar mount Those who scale it, under the garden, are inthan danger of death Garden we may take as symbolic Under that garden the bodies are buried Necronauts propose to visit there in imagination Greene has already gone.The narrator is his ancestor of a seven year old boy that he was, as he is, and writes in his garret By part 5 of Garden we are cooking up a disbelief in death Jarvis says of the monk s skulls, they don t believe in death anythan I do 45 While nobody will admit it the whole of the underground is symbolic, allegoric even of Celtic cauldrons, Dantean monoliths And of course he is addressing parts of himself and we believe just as much as we believe Kwang tze when he says the sagely man keeps his mouth shut and puts aside questions that are uncertain and dark making his inferior capacities unite with him in honoring the One Lord I,193 Kwang tze whose philosophy says there is none, then reverts to an appeal to the Infinite 196 Now either this is another case of Stephan Hawking who cannot make up his mind about God or it is a case where anyone who speaks of it doesn t know and those who don t do, which being interpreted means that in the metaphor and the symbol he says what otherwise he cannot say Thus we believe the metaphor and disbelieve the rhetoric of everything underground The Sun boat of Ra, the pushcarts obsidian, the rowboats paid with blind pennies, the rows of stones in every graveyard navigate the dead It is just as simple as remembering your grandfather.It s as though all our lives were living some dimly remembered impression received in a suspended state He seeks to find the daughter It has been the whole passion and expression of his life but not consciously known, not even now in the sense of the present of his writing, recollecting when he has been ajudged cancer terminal Doesn t that sound like every life You can deny it The underworld is eldritch with impression, cross between hobbits caught in the brewers hall and Alice in Wonder, AND THEN Javitts spills from a shoebox the jewels onto the floor, reds almost as deep as raw liver, stormy blues, greens like the underside of a wave 51 This allegory ABSOLUTE REALITY BELONGS TO DREAMS AND NOT TO LIFE There were necklaces and bracelets, lockets and bangles, pins and rings and pendants and buttons 52 You see it or feel it I can say as anyone I went to my Aunt s attic and occupied two hundred fifty years of the Hereford Mennonite past Great trunks full Shelves full Linens and hand painted china, chests of art It explains a half million words spilled of the Pennsylvania past I think, as Javitts says, it s nothing to what lies below out of sight The Acanthus markings in those pots come from a single woodblock cut by this Aunt kept in a box till I started hammering clay, bending edges into eyes and staining squares with cobalt I started this years after.To get further, all this is below the garden I started a garden again after the universes went into space, especially corn, standing in it up to ankles and calves For entertainment I took desert tagetes out to the street and planted it next to a full lippia that hangs over the curb Its gold will surmount with white balls the lippia as if the two were dancing They are up out of the flood to love the dry And having found the gold treasure Wildditch is off, back to moment when he departed and back to the desk where he writes And for validation he goes outside and meets the gardener and the story repatriates him into the mundane just the way the hobbits come home in the end and set right the shire, or Borges at last in the end goes back to Borges becomes Borges, merely Borges So Wildditch revisits the spot in the real that he knew in the irreal, finds it shabby and small, like waking in the dark to a room before dawn when a second before the eyes saw all the universe streaming I have undergrounds in the yard inhabited by tortoise I do not go there out of respect for their sanctity but feel the dark of their snugness and the ripe odor of the den I have a cavity upstairs, the crawl space where I laid a floor of boards to walk, but before they put induct I left a bag of silver there, forgot it ten years, then one day remembered and sent an expedition He kicked it with his foot he said I keep thinking there are trap doors in my aunt s house where she has hid the great treasure that I must find, dream continually of my grandfather s arts and crafts lodge on a lake with its secret compartments filled with sculptures and prints Last night I dreamed of a sculpture of my mother s, a head of ebony and Abyssinian and there I have looked into my wife s heart.Then he is about to go from the island, finding none of the artifacts of the past life below, he sees the oak, riven by lightning, sawn down and finds the po , the chamber pot he escaped with, and so he had a sense that there was a decision he had to make all over again 61 Go back or go on Years between reading this I planted my own red oak, on a whim that now rivals electric lines It is light and of dark Not to fear the dark, but not to deny, I went in my seventieth year but one, with Chuang Tzu and David, Yeats, the elders, into the abyss I had only dreamed It was deep pits, caves like the Balrog inhabits underground, but that is denial by metaphor The real is Jonah Runoff, as Hercules turned the rivers to clean them, but this is not about cattle, stables or manure, but the imagination So these things in the depth, in the Augean stables, how to simply clean them Isn t their memory their existence Doesn t taking away the memory take away the life But living with stink is a problem when consciousness comes.In PTSD, consciousness breaks involuntarily in upon dreams, smells, memories, fears The example comes to mind of Arthur Rimbaud who divides his life in two over the hope of recovering the key to his lost innocence Henry Miller, When Do Angels Cease to Resemble themselves A Study of Rimbaud New Directions 9, 39 So to quote Rimbaud if my spirit were always wide awake I would not have given in to degenerate instincts, to a forgotten epoch Miller says, what it was that sealed his vision, and thereby brought about his doom, no one knows and probably no one ever will know All our lives are filled with such events, maybe not all, but they are neutralized by denial, selection, amnesia, drugs In other words Rimbaud gives himself up to debauch and every vice just to forget the pain, the lost innocence He made himself monstrous He made himself a comprachicoes, who change the physical appearance of human beings by mutilating children, but on his own He mutilates his soul inexpertly, which is his salvation because his making monstrous doesn t take and he turns to faith.There are many likenesses to psychological disfigurement in the underworld comprachicoes applied mutilations, none greater than those of the German grandchildren of Rudolph Hoess, commandant of Auschwitz These things must either be faced or denied Rainer Hoess shows the immense pain but also the courage of the great The view is that silence is complicity The comprachicoes removed the memory of dislocated joints, stunting the spine, burning the face, incisions, manipulations and restraints with a drug, a stultifying powder, an anesthetic escape, so that the mind s ability to recall the depravities imposed on it was deadened, and if remembered, remembered with an anesthetic so the meaning of the pain was masked with forgetfulness Consciousness reconstructs, reconnects the pain with its meaning by removing the bandage of inoculated, anesthetic memory Then the pain of realization begins This happens over a lifetime and is rather different from immediate traumas of assault and consequent memories treated with propranolol This drug is said to pose an identity dilemma since our memories make us who we are and their removal prevents learning from our mistakes, the point being that if the comprachicoes could have administered propranolol they could have gone on mutilating and maiming ad infinitum, like the mandarin who is taken to another planet to be tortured forever in exchange for peace on earth Peace at the price of no memory So our sufferings make us whole in this view.There is a social issue raised by the suicide of Clay Hunt the vet activist who saw his friends killed in front of his eyes How much can the drugs, the escapes and consciousness heal There is no lack of disinfectant of the making monstrous and its memory among the unfeeling, but to take a view through metaphor, wind is greater than water, that is, the wind of consciousness is greater than the water of memory and identification of the pain You can know that on mountaintops Down at the pain, at sea level, mere humidity swallows you up without a fish in sight Swallowed by a fish, wake up in the belly, cradle and earth Similarities to a fish belly are darkness, humidity, vistas to cross Subject to forces and denial makes a Jonah Staying away from the beach won t help You get to be a hundred, two hundred and start to wake a little to these forces Three hundred and even in Bilbo Baggins belly light dawns in the darkness.So here s the promise, God will rescue him out of his trouble The trouble is himself and the forces He doesn t come without a past even if he doesn t know He doesn t come without a present even if he doesn t feel It gives meaning to blindness If it weren t for friends along the way, women usually, who save his life, he wouldn t survive at all He doesn t want to give account of the women though, he wants to account the forces He wants to take out after his enemies but he has to face himself All unmentionable, all dark shot with rays, lots of rays, but the light doesn t blind him The dark does Even in darkness light dawns for the upright He gets to be compassionate because of the dark, the affliction, the pain that lines tiled hallways of cement floors, all along the halls in different states of dementia, drooling, moaning This is no dream but an image from the past He s not nobody from the Midwest, he s worse He comes out of the grave shorn, unshorn with the memory of his sins His sins unless you say the innocent are the oppressed and what is done to the kindreds, the strange fruits of their tortures, beatings, is the fault of some enemy That s the one, the enemy of forces So he looked at three hundred into the dark and it was getting light By then he had lived twenty lives, thirty By then the illuminant hadn t filled every corner of the hallway in the belly They were all still there, but without the same power, like they had lost mass, like oxygenated a river were diverted in their midst This river he could float but not like some aging Huxley or Eiseley reimaging evolution, floating on his back down the canyons of rock Even at three hundred the light that dawns is still earth light the pains gibber at He walks down the center of the hall like he did the first time What did the boy see but what we know They could not touch him They had to wait for that That hadn t happened yet.What was it like in Noah s childhood Playing with too much water Jonah, playing at the wharf with pelicans for pets would come home with shells in a bag Nobody can say if we re all that way Oh do not call them naive who kick in the belly womb The fish is their life Life is their fish Moses floated early How far is it to where he kicks the rock He hit the rock with his stick He hit the rock Ouch The rock has a sense of humor about it even at the time it puts Moses to bed in Egypt We go down to get his body in a few years the way we go down to get our memory of the dirty hallway with its stretchers and wheelchairs The results of the finished work of the comprachicoes are all along both sides of the hall, misshapen, drooling Funny it has no smell That was from all the disinfectant There was no lack of disinfectant among the unfeeling Then of course there were all the drugs pumped into the skin That was before drugs were so common All the pains took them Palsy took him drugs Rage took Valium Lust had a range of pharmacopoeia Hatred must have eaten some Sicknesses all Diseases all Rampant in the hall Covered when the Lord entered that hall long before and found a species of Noah and Jonah A halllike a tunnel of misery My sin was there that I resurrect here My sins were theirs The enemies inoculate you with pain Redemption is not cleansing like a nuclear flash, or a flood It feelslike a plant growing.Jonah Runoff If water is the symbol of pain then there are different sizes of vessel in which the volume of water collects That does not indicate the pain is greater, it just means it is feltbecause of the larger vessel The water from a kitchen spigot is nothing compared to a thunder storm on the mountain, when the runs off the mountain and collects in the vessel The vessel feels thethan when a slicker laid on the ground Jonah was this kind of runoff He had to be sunk to make an impression.ShekhinahSo all this revealed with the good in the underground substrate, finding it out, as Greene s narrator does after he is terminal The good is even greater What nurse gets in bed with a patient One could embrace the heart being of a soul Necronauts boast they ride in Charon s boat, cross and recross with Dante Are they 40, 50, 60, 70, in full flesh after meal, wine and love made possible and satiate until long sleep and talk of Beckett dying David has just this boatman, this flower How his hair is growing thin Cheeks hang You think the mind diminished but he sees what frightens all, his life and work are not enough He sees the cold, no alibi Everybody knows Faulkner frowns None good Gone down in ships Vanity, said the man s son.Shekhinah is the girl in David s bed It is a parable of age He was cold at the end, no longer dreamed of what he lived Not full of himself, the athlete supple beyond bend, who led a troop fifteen fugitive years, slept on the ground, fasted for days could not get warm He shivers in the kingdom with memories and when he opens his eyes he is not home He is in a tent with a flag on the top like a Bedouin, surrounded by sweets he can t eat, lords and courtiers he can t stand So they bring a girl to warm him She lays beside the memories of Absalom and Gath, Saul at night, air and men, intrigues and women He is freezing She feels the bone Compassion flows around them She feels the wasted muscle of the sinew arms Compassion flows around them, feet and hands She loves the man, else how stand Now he sleeps She has fulfilled rest to the king But he stirs His dreams are light He thinks of Absalom She is a nurse, a blanket, a pillow The lights are out A guard stands What kind of love has the girl in his bed For a friend, to sing and hold when they go where none has gone Go not alone is the wisdom of the home The everlasting in the bed, his fingers ache, digestion unsettles, gaps in his teeth, eyes dry on good days No cough, dementia or out of breath moaning Her comfort does not prolong.He sees beyond the bone The miracle of the words so great he has set apart the godly for himself You have filled my heart with greater joy I will lie down and sleep in peace These are good Four sons lost How do we know he lives a life of faith Hang around all night He says with amazement what spring and winter behold in each other in the sea they can t cross She holds tight in these fits Heart reaches Wishes herself two You call this a king and bone shop Think, having done, of ancestral memory, as there is of birth and life, that folk wisdom of death initiates itself While old ladies in the home, all men having gone, whisper to one another that they know They boast We never quite find out, till flesh melts quick as it can She doesn t leave She has been thousands of years III parts Part II Continued here

  7. Heidi (KosminenK) says:

    Nelj lyhytt tarinaa Fantastisia elementtej , rajojen ylityksi , olemassaolon pohdintaa kun perusta henkinen, psyykkinen, eettinen jne , jolle el m rakentunut murenee pois Lapsuuden ja aikuisuuden todellisuusk sitysten vertailua, uskonnon katolinen pohdintaa ja pohjustuksia moraalisille pohdinnoille esimerkki eriarvoisuudesta ja osattomuudesta.Ekassa tarinassa kuolemansairas mies palaa lapsuutensa maisemiin ja muistelee lapsuuden seikkailukokemusta puutarhan alapuolella olevassa maailmast Nelj lyhytt tarinaa Fantastisia elementtej , rajojen ylityksi , olemassaolon pohdintaa kun perusta henkinen, psyykkinen, eettinen jne , jolle el m rakentunut murenee pois Lapsuuden ja aikuisuuden todellisuusk sitysten vertailua, uskonnon katolinen pohdintaa ja pohjustuksia moraalisille pohdinnoille esimerkki eriarvoisuudesta ja osattomuudesta.Ekassa tarinassa kuolemansairas mies palaa lapsuutensa maisemiin ja muistelee lapsuuden seikkailukokemusta puutarhan alapuolella olevassa maailmasta, jossa h nen unen muistonsa mukaan el eli hyvin eriskummallinen pariskunta omanlaisessaan todellisuudessa T m kohtaaminen on j tt nyt nuoreen poikaan l htem tt m n vaikutuksen, jonka pohjalta h n on el m ns el nyt Toisessa tarinassa kohdataan uskonsa menett nyt tai suhteensa uskoonsa menett nyt katolilainen kirjailija Greene Kolmannessa tarinassa yl luokkainen el k itynyt l k ri antaa korkea arvoiselle kenraalille kotinsa juhlapaikaksi, koska t m ei p se sairastuttuaan bilett m n Monte Carloon, mutta k yh sairasta miest l k ri ei auta t m n ahdingossa Nelj nness tarinassa seurataan lapsijoukon seikkailua meren rell olevan kotikyl n rajojen ulkopuolelle Aarteenmets stys p ttyy lasten h mmennykseen valaanruhoa muistuttavan talon sis lle, jossa he kohtaavat heille kummallisia asioita Lukija tajuaa loppua kohden, ett mit lapset ovat.Kirjassa on hyv t hetkens Erikoinen tunnelma, j nnite, odotuksen tuntu, moraalista ja eksistentiaalista pohdintaa her ttelev tekstiaineista Olen tottunut lukemaan kummallista kamaa, jonka joukossa my s vanhempaa englantilaista fantasiaa hyvine subliimi tajunnanr j ytys ja huonoine rasismi, sukupuolten ep tasa arvo, kolonialismi yms puolineen T m ei aiheuttanut subliimeja kiksej , mutta facepalmeja muutamilta osin Lopputulema Ihan hyv t tripit, mutta kyll t st tuli my s krapula

  8. Jim says:

    Whenever I come back to Graham Greene after a hiatus of several months, I always become newly enad of his writing A Sense of Reality consists of four short stories, two of which have somewhat fantastic elements from a child s point of view The longest story, Under the Garden is about the narrator s memory of being in a strange underground cave inhabited by a one legged man named Javitt and his wife mother consort named Maria who speaks in quacks Of course, when the narrator comes back t Whenever I come back to Graham Greene after a hiatus of several months, I always become newly enad of his writing A Sense of Reality consists of four short stories, two of which have somewhat fantastic elements from a child s point of view The longest story, Under the Garden is about the narrator s memory of being in a strange underground cave inhabited by a one legged man named Javitt and his wife mother consort named Maria who speaks in quacks Of course, when the narrator comes back to the same location decades later, the large island on a lake is now a small island in a pond which couldn t have a system of tunnels underneath it.The other three stories are also well written and run the gamut from irony Dream of a Strange Land to religion A Visit to Morin

  9. Stewart says:

    A Sense of Reality is a collection of only four short stories by Graham Greene, published in 1963 The collection is significantly different in subject matter from his better known andrealistic fiction in that it explores fantasies, beliefs, and dreams At 55 pages, Under the Garden is the longest story of the four It sa novella than short story William Wilditch, diagnosed with a life threatening lung obstruction, presumably cancer, takes the train from London and returns A Sense of Reality is a collection of only four short stories by Graham Greene, published in 1963 The collection is significantly different in subject matter from his better known andrealistic fiction in that it explores fantasies, beliefs, and dreams At 55 pages, Under the Garden is the longest story of the four It sa novella than short story William Wilditch, diagnosed with a life threatening lung obstruction, presumably cancer, takes the train from London and returns to his childhood home in East Anglia, still owned by his brother The two of them realize while talking about their old house and their childhoods that their recollections are quite different The great gap between their memories astonished him They seemed to be talking about different places and different people Wilditch finds a story he had written for his school magazine about the inhabitants of an underground cave on the old estate, based on a dream he had as a 13 year old student But he dislikes the story because it is not how he remembers the dream He spends the night writing the story as he recollects it at this later date The story goes on much too long, I think, but I will give Greene credit for venturing outside his usual fictional world into a world of fantasy and dream and memoryreminiscent of Lewis Carroll To me, the most interesting story was A Visit to Morin from 1959, about religious belief and nonbelief The first person narrator, a nonbeliever named Dunlop, had admired a writer Pierre Morin when he had read him in French as a boy in a French class Morin s writing had contained an exciting blend of Catholic orthodoxy with just a hint of heresy But Dunlop had forgotten about him as an adult, as had the literary world But it is the fate of revolutionaries that the world accepts them The excitement was gone from Morin s pages, Graham writes The narrator has become a copywriter for a firm of wine merchants, and business brings him to Colmar in northeastern France during the Christmas holidays He comes across a book of Morin s at a bookstore and learns from the bookstore owner that the elderly author lives nearby At Christmas Eve Mass, Dunlop spots the author seated in the back of the church, which was in a village far from Morin s residence Morin and Dunlop are conspicuous in not receiving communion at the Midnight Mass Morin invites Dunlop to his home and reveals that he has lost his belief in the Catholic church but not his faith, a distinction he tries to explain to his English visitor It s not a stretch to think of Pierre Morin as Greene in French disguise Greene converted to Catholicism in 1926 at age 22, but he was always a strange Catholic As Pico Iyer writes of Greene in his introduction to this short story collection, He pledged himself to a faith that would always leave him disappointed in a careworn hope somewhere between the complacency of the solid believer and the nonchalance of the skeptic These stories reveal a different Greene, although these four stories are not as compelling to me as some of hisrealistic short stories and novels

  10. Owain says:

    Greene s short stories are quite different from his novels Of which I ve read quite a few now Several of these stories are complete within the fantasy genre which is novel because I didn t think that was really Greene s style Only one, A Visit to Morin dwells on Catholicism which I find rather tedious in the author s work, but you have to deal with it if you want to read him The aforementioned story did have one quite memorable quote in it though, No Not if you want to believe If you are Greene s short stories are quite different from his novels Of which I ve read quite a few now Several of these stories are complete within the fantasy genre which is novel because I didn t think that was really Greene s style Only one, A Visit to Morin dwells on Catholicism which I find rather tedious in the author s work, but you have to deal with it if you want to read him The aforementioned story did have one quite memorable quote in it though, No Not if you want to believe If you are foolish enough to want that you must avoid theology I don t understand He said, A man can accept anything to do with God until scholars begin to go into the details and the implications I also like the first story, Under the Garden, as it reminded me of the film Pan s Labyrinth Although of course Greene s story probably predates the story from the film