Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America

Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New
    Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New and Ronald Reagan, and shows how, fromto , these two men the same age, and driven by the same heroic ambitions changed American politics forever The liberal and the conservative The deal making arm twister and the cool communicator The Texas rancher and the Hollywood star Opposites in politics and style, Johnson and Reagan shared a defining impulse to set forth a grand story of America, a story in which he could be the hero In the tumultuous days after the Kennedy assassination, Johnson and Reagan each, in turn, seized the chance to offer the country a new vision for the future Bringing to life their vivid personalities and the anxious mood of America in a radically transformative time, Darman shows how, in promising the impossible, Johnson and Reagan jointly dismantled the long American tradition of consensus politics and ushered in a new era of fracture History comes to life in Darman s vivid, fly on the wall storytelling Even as Johnson publicly revels in his triumphs, we see him grow obsessed with dark forces he believes are out to destroy him, while his wife, Lady Bird, urges her husband to put aside his paranoia and see the world as it really is And as the war in Vietnam threatens to overtake his presidency, we witness Johnson desperately struggling to compensate with ever extravagant promises for his Great Society On the other side of the country, Ronald Reagan, a fading actor years removed from his Hollywood glory, gradually turns toward a new career in California politics We watch him delivering speeches to crowds who are desperate for a new leader And we see him wielding his well honed instinct for timing, waiting for Johnson s majestic promises to prove empty before he steps back into the spotlight, on his long journey toward the presidency From Johnson s election in , the greatest popular vote landslide in American history, to the pivotalmidterms, when Reagan burst forth onto the national stage, Landslide brings alive a country transformed by riots, protests, the rise of television, the shattering of consensus and the two towering personalities whose choices in those moments would reverberate through the country for decades to come."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 448
  • Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America
  • Jonathan Darman
  • English
  • 15 September 2017
  • null

About the Author: Jonathan Darman

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Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New AmericaLandslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New landslide: epub, ronald mobile, reagan ebok, dawn kindle, america epub, Landslide: LBJ pdf, and Ronald book, Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New AmericaLBJ and Ronald pdf, LBJ and Ronald Reagan at epub, Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America PDF/EPUBIn politics, the man who takes and Ronald Epub Ù the highest spot after a landslide Landslide: LBJ PDF or is not standing on solid ground In this riveting work of narrative nonfiction, LBJ and Ronald PDF ↠ Jonathan Darman tells the story of two giants of American politics, Lyndon Johnson and Ronald Reagan, and shows how, fromto , these two men the same age, and driven by the same heroic ambitions changed American politics forever The liberal and the conservative The deal making arm twister and the cool communicator The Texas rancher and the Hollywood star Opposites in politics and style, Johnson and Reagan shared a defining impulse to set forth a grand story of America, a story in which he could be the hero In the tumultuous days after the Kennedy assassination, Johnson and Reagan each, in turn, seized the chance to offer the country a new vision for the future Bringing to life their vivid personalities and the anxious mood of America in a radically transformative time, Darman shows how, in promising the impossible, Johnson and Reagan jointly dismantled the long American tradition of consensus politics and ushered in a new era of fracture History comes to life in Darman s vivid, fly on the wall storytelling Even as Johnson publicly revels in his triumphs, we see him grow obsessed with dark forces he believes are out to destroy him, while his wife, Lady Bird, urges her husband to put aside his paranoia and see the world as it really is And as the war in Vietnam threatens to overtake his presidency, we witness Johnson desperately struggling to compensate with ever extravagant promises for his Great Society On the other side of the country, Ronald Reagan, a fading actor years removed from his Hollywood glory, gradually turns toward a new career in California politics We watch him delivering speeches to crowds who are desperate for a new leader And we see him wielding his well honed instinct for timing, waiting for Johnson s majestic promises to prove empty before he steps back into the spotlight, on his long journey toward the presidency From Johnson s election in , the greatest popular vote landslide in American history, to the pivotalmidterms, when Reagan burst forth onto the national stage, Landslide brings alive a country transformed by riots, protests, the rise of television, the shattering of consensus and the two towering personalities whose choices in those moments would reverberate through the country for decades to come.

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10 thoughts on “Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America

  1. Conor Ahern says:

    So, I guess the premise of this book was that both LBJ and Reagan saw themselves as fatidic heroes in trying times, but rather than save the nation as each set out to do, they overpromised and oversimplified, kindling the passions of modern partisans unproductively Their opposite messianic narratives are ones we know well Reagan s, that government is the bane of freedom and enemy of prosperity and Johnson s, that government checks the baser instincts of man and is the only force potent and re So, I guess the premise of this book was that both LBJ and Reagan saw themselves as fatidic heroes in trying times, but rather than save the nation as each set out to do, they overpromised and oversimplified, kindling the passions of modern partisans unproductively Their opposite messianic narratives are ones we know well Reagan s, that government is the bane of freedom and enemy of prosperity and Johnson s, that government checks the baser instincts of man and is the only force potent and restrained enough to inaugurate peace and prosperity It s an intriguing premise, but one that mostly just bookends the bulk of the book, which seems to be a narrative of the psyches leading these men to the presidency and the internal tribulations that rankled their ambitions In other words, it was informative, but it perhaps overpromised I liked this book, and it sure as hell made me want to read an unbiased book about Reagan, much as this will probably earn me the same stinkeye on the subway that I reserve for people wearing Make America Great Again hats or really any red hats these days I m bothimpressed with LBJ my god he accomplished a lot andjaded for learning of his machinations the idea that Democrats had to embroil the nation in Asian land wars with Communists just to parry claims that they were Red sympathizers strikes me, albeit in hindsight, as so ridiculous and so sad, given the toll it took on our country and on the browner peoples of the globe and it makes me admire Obama that muchfor undertaking healthcare without a rattling saber And the way LBJ treated that loyal gay aide was really shameful , and disgusted and intrigued by Reagan he used to be a New Deal Democrat And why are we talking about Mike Pence calling his wife mother when Reagan called Nancy Mommy shudder Like so many pre 2016 Election books, this one ends on a hopeful note that seems almost comical in hindsight This is literally the last paragraph of the book The problem for today s political system and it is an existential one is that people no longer believe those myths To fix its broken politics, today s America needs new stories Or, perhaps it just needs a new version of an old one the shared version that Johnson and Reagan discarded in the course of their 1000 days The old consensus vision of Roosevelt and Kennedy contained lasting wisdom that today s leaders would do well to adopt In that world view, politicians had to be deeply realistic and humble when making promises for the future For they knew that the future never turned out exactly the way it s going to But they also had to have the courage to tell people that though government would never be able to solve all of its people s problems, it had a sacred obligation to try That old vision could serve America well in an often frightening new century The answer to our problems may come from a leader who brings such a simple message It is a message that neither Reagan nor Johnson had much use for, but that the story of both of their lives confirms what lies ahead of us is not the certain promise of utopia, but the infinite possibilities of life itself Sigh One can hope we ll sober up before it s too late.All in all, an informative and interesting book, even if it wasunderappreciated historical summary than anything else

  2. Kressel Housman says:

    This book compares and contrasts the political careers of LBJ and Ronald Reagan in the mid sixties LBJ was president, winning by a historic landslide in 1964, and Reagan was just entering politics, winning a landslide gubernatorial election in 1966 His was a Republican victory in a populous state in a midterm election a great disappointment for the sitting Democratic president, much as we just saw this past November.But the similarities to today s times don t end there Though the book has p This book compares and contrasts the political careers of LBJ and Ronald Reagan in the mid sixties LBJ was president, winning by a historic landslide in 1964, and Reagan was just entering politics, winning a landslide gubernatorial election in 1966 His was a Republican victory in a populous state in a midterm election a great disappointment for the sitting Democratic president, much as we just saw this past November.But the similarities to today s times don t end there Though the book has plenty to say about the personalities of both men, the main contrast is in the myths they both represented, myths that we re still hearing over and over again today LBJ, founder of the Great Society, was the force behind our current social safety net a k a welfare state Language is so politicized Reagan called himself an opponent of big government, so one of the main aims of his program was to cut social programs a k a entitlements Sound familiar The author stays in the 60 s for the bulk of the book and never makes any direct comparisons to the present until the Afterword I don t think President Obama s name appears even once in the book But any astute observer of politics will see the ideological origins of the red state blue state divide at the very beginning, which makes the book an astounding achievement It simultaneously gives you a picture of the 60 s while keeping you connected to 2014 I received a copy of this book from the publisher through the History Book Club on GoodReads

  3. Sera says:

    3.5 starsAll in all, an informative read about LBJ and Reagan and how one was able to capitalize on his landslide victory for the White House and how the other one didn t I wanted to read this book because I have a terrible gap in my knowledge of Presidents Johnson and Reagan Darman did nice job of providing insight into each man s rise to power and why Reagan was successful in maintaining his popularity throughout his Presidency and Johnson was not.The downside of this book was that the autho 3.5 starsAll in all, an informative read about LBJ and Reagan and how one was able to capitalize on his landslide victory for the White House and how the other one didn t I wanted to read this book because I have a terrible gap in my knowledge of Presidents Johnson and Reagan Darman did nice job of providing insight into each man s rise to power and why Reagan was successful in maintaining his popularity throughout his Presidency and Johnson was not.The downside of this book was that the author failed to use citations, and thus, the reader was often confused about whether something was fact or simply the author s opinion Couple this issue with the editorializing that Darman does from time to time in the book, and it s clear that this book is not a scholarly piece of work, thereby making its contents to some extent unreliable.In light of the foregoing, this book will likely not appear on history buff s must read lists, but for what it is, a book that reads like a lengthy magazine article, it helped to fill the void at least in this reader s Presidential knowledge.P.S There s also some cool stuff about Kennedys and how manipulative they were especially Jackie when it came to JFK s legacy These snippets alone earned the book an additional 1 2 star

  4. Michael Griswold says:

    I picked up Landslide by Jonathan Darman because Lyndon Johnson and Ronald Reagan are not two presidents who are often linked together I want to be very clear in this review about what the book is and is not.Landslide is primarily set in the 1960 s and begins with the Kennedy assassination and Lyndon Johnson assuming the presidency Darman does a great job within these first two chapters of positioning LBJ and Reagan as powerful men with ambition for days who were plagued by shadows LBJ appear I picked up Landslide by Jonathan Darman because Lyndon Johnson and Ronald Reagan are not two presidents who are often linked together I want to be very clear in this review about what the book is and is not.Landslide is primarily set in the 1960 s and begins with the Kennedy assassination and Lyndon Johnson assuming the presidency Darman does a great job within these first two chapters of positioning LBJ and Reagan as powerful men with ambition for days who were plagued by shadows LBJ appeared consumed by at once busting out of the mythicized shadow of JFK, while not appearing to publicly degrade him Reagan meanwhile had to bust out of his public persona as a Hollywood actor, and later break away from the radical wing of the Republican Party personified by Barry Goldwater.We get this very contradictory portrait of LBJ as this man who had experienced great successes such as the Great Society and Civil Rights, but was prone to bouts of gloomy pessimistic sadness even during successful periods. On a personal level, he viewed himself as a great president, yet could never break out of the shadow of his predecessor, no matter how much legislation he passed By 1966, his gloom piled up as Vietnam threatened to consume his entire presidency and his large Democratic majority in Congress had been washed away, derailing his hopes for the ultimate vision of the Great Society.Ronald Reagan appears almost phantom like in the shadows of LBJ s presidency, slowly picking up steam during speeches throughout the country against the excesses and wastes of The Great Society This is the vision of Reagan until the final seventy or so pages when we see the LBJ version of society crack and fray and Reagan rise to become the governor of California This book is primarily set in the 1960 s and talks about the Johnson Presidency and Reagan s rise from actor to political heavyweight.I would now like to talk about what this book is not Although Darman talks about Johnson and Reagan representing two visions of what America should be, he only briefly touches on the Reagan presidency in the last 20 30 pages of the book Darman would have been better served to go into the same detail for both presidencies to better the argument However, it would ve probably been an 700 800 page text, if he had done that He also talks about both parties struggling to move beyond the powerful visions these men cast I would ve liked to have heardof that discussion as it seems particularly relevant to today s political climate.A masterful look at how one presidency gave rise to another

  5. Jason says:

    I have mixed feelings regarding this one, partly because I was so anxious for it to be released and secondly because I felt sort of let down by parts of the book itself.For starters let me just state that the author s idea for the topic for this book was amazing The fact that he utilized the rise of Ronald Reagan in his nascent youth was a bit off putting for me As of late I have developed an entirely new respect for the presidency of Lyndon B Johnson and so to me major portions of this book I have mixed feelings regarding this one, partly because I was so anxious for it to be released and secondly because I felt sort of let down by parts of the book itself.For starters let me just state that the author s idea for the topic for this book was amazing The fact that he utilized the rise of Ronald Reagan in his nascent youth was a bit off putting for me As of late I have developed an entirely new respect for the presidency of Lyndon B Johnson and so to me major portions of this book were simply fascinating A lot of the LBJ portion of the book deals with his development of his so called Great Society of domestic social programs An even bigger part of the LBJ story deals with his response to what was originally just a crisis halfway around the world but would soon morph into the biggest and most brutal war this country has ever taken part in the Vietnam conflict.The Reagan portions I felt were quite bland in general, but they held my interest enough that I was able to finish the sections After all, this book just deals with Ronald Reagan starting his career in the political arena after having been in Hollywood for years We have years to go to get to the plateau of the Great Communicator still At the time of the events in this book, those days are decades away.In conclusion, I think the author could have just focused entirely on LBJ instead of bringing Reagan into the mix All in all, I think this book is quite uneven with the LBJ sections far outweighing the Reagan ones I still would encourage you to read this story As much as I believe it to be a story that every American citizen needs to know, I think you might find better versions of it elsewhere I m not saying I hated this book, I just think that it skims the surface not probing deep enough to get to the real heart of the entire story If anything, this book would be a good jumping off point for ones further study into the years of the Johnson administration and the original rise to prominence of one of the most beloved leaders of American History.ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN 2014

  6. William Walker says:

    The basic theme of this book is that during the mid sixties, the consensus politics of Roosevelt Kennedy was replaced by a partisan model focused mainly on myths Johnson s liberal progressive myth of the Great Society that poverty was to be fought as a war to be won by the federal government and its replacement Reagan s conservative myth that all problems of society were caused by the federal government In 1964, Johnson had an approval rating in the 80% range, saw passage of the Civil Right The basic theme of this book is that during the mid sixties, the consensus politics of Roosevelt Kennedy was replaced by a partisan model focused mainly on myths Johnson s liberal progressive myth of the Great Society that poverty was to be fought as a war to be won by the federal government and its replacement Reagan s conservative myth that all problems of society were caused by the federal government In 1964, Johnson had an approval rating in the 80% range, saw passage of the Civil Rights Act, Medicare, OEO, and on and on, won the 1964 election by a massive landslide, and read the obits of the conservative movement at a political force In late 1966, Reagan was elected Governor of California by a landslide, the Democrats got clobbered in the election and Johnson s approval rating was in the toilet Darman offers his analysis of what happened in a manner that will undoubtedly alienate liberals for his portrayal of Johnson and likewise alienate conservatives for his portrayal of Reagan although, on balance Reagan does come off a bit the better of the two I would guess that this book will be especially enjoyed by those like me who lived through the era and first experienced a political awareness

  7. Michael Blackmer says:

    This was a very interesting book bringing me face to face with a major portion of key US history I had little understanding of this era prior to reading Landslide Most of what I had read of the late sixties centered around the Vietnam War rather than the political atmosphere at the time I found it very interested to read about these two great men and the men of history surrounding them LBJ was my first president, I was a baby and toddler during his presidency, but he was my first president This was a very interesting book bringing me face to face with a major portion of key US history I had little understanding of this era prior to reading Landslide Most of what I had read of the late sixties centered around the Vietnam War rather than the political atmosphere at the time I found it very interested to read about these two great men and the men of history surrounding them LBJ was my first president, I was a baby and toddler during his presidency, but he was my first president Reagan became president in the first election I in which I was of voting age While I did not always agree with the conclusions of the author he does present the lives of these two men in a very interesting manner and draws the readers attention to the overlap and parallels between these two presidents

  8. Martin Zook says:

    Around 7 a.m one morning during the peak, if you want to call it that, of the 1988 US presidential campaign, the fax machine near my desk at work rattled to life Given the hour, my interest was piqued.An X rated cartoon of a penis desperately chasing a vagina eked out of the machine, line by line The caption read, With Bush and Dukakis, it s just one F ing thing after another That was the election I wrote in my father s name It seemed like the right thing to do.Perhaps the cartoonist, and Around 7 a.m one morning during the peak, if you want to call it that, of the 1988 US presidential campaign, the fax machine near my desk at work rattled to life Given the hour, my interest was piqued.An X rated cartoon of a penis desperately chasing a vagina eked out of the machine, line by line The caption read, With Bush and Dukakis, it s just one F ing thing after another That was the election I wrote in my father s name It seemed like the right thing to do.Perhaps the cartoonist, and myself, were guilty of succumbing to the political malaise originated by the unfulfillable myths created by presidents Johnson and Reagan explored by Jonathan Darman in Landslide LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America.In the afterword tacked onto the end of this magazine piece expanded to 376 pages, Darman concludes, To fix its broken politics, today s America needs new stories Or perhaps it just needs a new version of an old one Briefly, Darman attributes much of the seemingly failing politics of the country to the overly simplistic myths cooked up around Johnson during his campaign for the Great Society and Reagan s reactionary response to it and the myth that the cult of the individual, unburdened of government s chains, is the country s future.Both myths, Darman finds, are overly simplistic reactions to uncertainties that faced the country He argues for anuanced message from political leaders acknowledging that the future is not certain, despite the pablum served up during campaign season.Darman s choice of Johnson and Reagan administrations is imaginative and his writing makes Landslide imminently accessible and readable I m not so sure there is anything particularly new in the narrative, although the revelation that Johnson planned to attend the 64 Democratic convention in Atlantic City to tell delegates he wouldn t run was news to me and my son resident presidential scholar here.In the afterword, which should be read first as an introduction, Darman attributes the tendency in American politics to gravitate to one of the two polar myths when confronted during crises of uncertainty.There are a number of flaws in Darman s book It fails to take into account the universal distrust of government, not just in America s short history, but through all time in all governments It is, after all, a guy named Aristotle who in his Politics concludes there is no good government Best to form a hybrid of the various types republic and democracy for the US and muddle by as best we can.From the Articles of Confederation to today s congressional morass, and all points in between, there is good reason to find that Aristotle was on the money.And contrary to what Darman offers, perhaps the fault does not lie in the myths created by the leaders and their camps To be sure, both Johnson s promise of communal utopia and Reagan s cult of the individual are flawed But so are other myths that rise from political camp fires It s an old story.But, what s the alternative Darman would have us believe what he calls consensus politics and myths, such as those offered by FDR and JFK are the answer But if LBJ and Reagan didn t practice consensus politics LBJ in passing his impressive body of civil rights legislation, and Medicare Reagan in his tax cuts and welfare reform , then they practiced nothing.Darman s examination of Reagan especially could bethorough, not an easy task I know given the likelihood that Reagan essentially was a cipher At one point, Darman notes that aside from Reagan s obsession with the perceived threat of communism reminiscent of Goldwater, he didn t really hold any strong beliefs, which allowed him to make compromises don t tell today s Republicans This dynamic would warrant athorough examination.In addition to findings that don t seem to hold up, Darman s text makes many claims about motivations and thinking by individuals that needs some kind of attribution, 32 pages of notes not excluded The reader is left wondering How does Darman know that As might be expected with an expanded magazine piece there is a great deal of repetition He attributes a hero fetish to both candidates and repeatedly drives the point home But again aside from the fact both politicians liked to ride horses we are offered little in the way of evidence that their heroic aspirations are anything out of the ordinary for presidents Nor does this claim seem relevant to his narrative.Normally, each book should be examined on its own merits Readers who dwell on what a book doesn t include generally are unfair, I think That said, the importance of the myths Darman cites begs the question of the media used to deliver those stories During the Johnson administration, we saw TV supplant print This was a revolution that perhaps should be taken into consideration in any narrative that explores political myths of the day.During the Reagan administration, the microcomputer emerged, as big a revolution as TV supplanting newspapers It presages individuals ability to broadcast their own myths, regardless of facts.These media developments, even though not mentioned by Darman, are widely known and may give the lie to Darman s yearning for consensus politics when radio and print were the dominant media.Think of it In the day of faxes, that cartoon in 1988 slowly was sent from one machine to another, to maybe half a dozen sites Today that message could be global in a matter of hours, if not sooner.The stories around campaigns are no longer authored so much by politicians and their organizations as by any fool in front of a keyboard who can strike a cord with their followers and their followers followers and those following the followers of their followers and by Jonathan Darman

  9. Bentley says:

    Jonathan Darman s book Landslide is a great first book by a well known Newsweek journalist He has a way of presenting history and historical details with the expertise of a skilled news man What makes the storyline and the book so engaging is his talent as a journalist.And that is the style and the reason that this book grabs you immediately and draws you in The true historian would have a slow build while the news writer journalist gets the lead in the first line Darman knows how to write a Jonathan Darman s book Landslide is a great first book by a well known Newsweek journalist He has a way of presenting history and historical details with the expertise of a skilled news man What makes the storyline and the book so engaging is his talent as a journalist.And that is the style and the reason that this book grabs you immediately and draws you in The true historian would have a slow build while the news writer journalist gets the lead in the first line Darman knows how to write a good lead and that is why the book just propels itself naturally from chapter to chapter.The drawback of this approach is that some readers never capture the true essence and factual backdrop of the story or the reference and primary source material behind the lead Some of the readers felt that this was a missing part rather than simply ajournalistic approach to history.I enjoyed the book tremendously and would have loved to have dialoguedwith its author One question that I did have is why the prologue was notaggressively edited by the publisher because the depth and the breadth hadthe feel of an advance or an outline of the entire book versus an introductory piece It was too long, too meaty and could have stood alone as a short story for publication in The Atlantic I wondered why the book was being condensed in the prologue I honestly would recommend that you not read the prologue first too much is given away Everyone approaches a book differently but most readers will find that this book is fun, informative and an engaging read What it is not is a deep historical and heavily researched account such as those that Caro wrote about LBJ From my viewpoint, Jonathan Darman had one foot in the journalistic camp and another in the historian one I am hoping that in his next book he decides on which side of the fence he wants to be.I recommend this book with great confidence and believe that most folks would love this book and would also want to read Mr Darman s next effort I am one of those readers and believe that I will become a great fan of his writing I do want to add that I am a fan of Landslide a wonderful first book by Mr Darman In compliance with FTC guidelines, please note that I received this book for free through the History Book Club on Goodreads by Jonathan Darman by Robert A Caro Robert A Caro

  10. Rick says:

    I received a copy of Landslide LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America by Jonathan Darman Random House, 2014 at a Random House Library Program at my local library Random House was trotting out all of its coming attractions and handing out ARCs, and I snagged this one This was a very nice read especially if you are 60 ish and or a fan of politics Let me explain.The narrative focuses on the two named characters during the period late 1963 assassination of JFK through early 196 I received a copy of Landslide LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America by Jonathan Darman Random House, 2014 at a Random House Library Program at my local library Random House was trotting out all of its coming attractions and handing out ARCs, and I snagged this one This was a very nice read especially if you are 60 ish and or a fan of politics Let me explain.The narrative focuses on the two named characters during the period late 1963 assassination of JFK through early 1969 when LBJ walked off the Washington DC stage When I picked up the book I thought it a confusing time period certainly a big time for LBJ but not so much for Reagan RR and I thought the pairing of Johnson and Reagan a bit strange, but theI read theI understood the connections For LBJ it was a period of struggling with his self worth how he achieved the presidency going from Master of the Senate to second banana to unelected president , how he never could shake off the ghost of the Kennedy s, how he went from the landslide re election of 1964 to losing the House two years later, how his Great Society became unfulfilled, how civil rights impacted his term, and how Vietnam became his legacy For RR it was a time of finding himself how he was pretty much jobless in California, how he began to have an interest in politics, how he reinvented himself for his greatest role, how he steered a path between conservative and moderate, and how this period set the stage for his presidency a dozen years later In all fairness the book is probably 60% LBJ and 40% RR, but it still was a delight to read If you are 60 ish you lived through that time, and the tale is a wonderful dissecting of that narrow period and the political chess moves in American politics of the two main actors If you enjoy politics you ll enjoy this book Darman s scrutiny of the period is much in the genre of Game Change by Heilemann Halperin the in depth look at politics and the political intrigue of the 2008 presidential race Landslide is political analysis at its best When LBJ was elected in his own right in a landslide in 1964 the powers that be thought it the beginning of a long liberal period in politics Yet two years later RR was elected governor of California on the basis of his being the change factor much like Obama years later LBJ and RR form the magnetic poles of the story The narrative also brings in the Kennedy Camelot myth, Mayor Richard J Daley, Barry Goldwater, Martin Luther King, Lady Bird Johnson, Jackie and Bobby Kennedy, and many other characters There is an Epilogue and Afterward to close the circle on all the primary characters It is a good period piece Highly recommended