The King's Exile

The King's Exile eBook ☆ The King's  PDF or
  • Hardcover
  • 368
  • The King's Exile
  • Andrew Swanston
  • English
  • 23 July 2017
  • 0593068882

About the Author: Andrew Swanston

The King's Exile eBook ☆ The King's PDF or king's ebok, exile epub, The King's pdf, The King's ExileThe King's Exile PDF/EPUBAndrew Swanston read Law at Cambridge University, and held various positions in the book trade, including being a director of Waterstone Co, and chairman of Methven s plc, before turning to writing Inspired by a lifelong interest in early modern history, his Thomas Hill novels are set during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms and the early period The King's PDF or of the Restoration Incendium is the first of two novels set in the s and Waterloo The Bravest Man describes the vital defence of Hougoumont at the battle Beautiful Star and Other Stories will be published in early He lives with his wife in Surrey.


The King's ExileThe King's Exile eBook ☆ The King's PDF or king's ebok, exile epub, The King's pdf, The King's ExileThe King's Exile PDF/EPUBThomas Hill is arrested on charges invented by his old enemy Tobias Rush, whom he thought had been executed for treason He is deported to Barbados where he is indentured to Rush s business partners When news of the King s execution arrives, political stability on the island is threatened Also in danger is Thomas s sister and The King's PDF or nieces back in England, and he knows he must return home to them However when a fleet commanded by Admiral Sir George Ayscue arrives to take control of the island for Cromwell, his departure is blocked A coded message from Ayscue to a sympathiser on the island is intercepted, and Thomas is asked to decipher it A potentially disastrous battle seems inevitable, and Thomas volunteers for the dangerous role of envoy to Ayscue But with his sworn enemy hot on his heels, will Thomas ever find safety and make it home to his family alive.

You may also like...

10 thoughts on “The King's Exile

  1. Annet says:

    A plot to murder, a nation at war Nowhere is safe.Second book of an enjoyable, entertaining historical series I think I ll read the final book in the 3 book series during summer holidays People who like to read historical books, will enjoy this series and this writer Found him last year, when he published a book which I think will be the first in a new historical series, Incendium 3 rating I read this comment from a Goodreads reader and it is spot on for me Not as good as the f A plot to murder, a nation at war Nowhere is safe.Second book of an enjoyable, entertaining historical series I think I ll read the final book in the 3 book series during summer holidays People who like to read historical books, will enjoy this series and this writer Found him last year, when he published a book which I think will be the first in a new historical series, Incendium 3 rating I read this comment from a Goodreads reader and it is spot on for me Not as good as the first in the series, but nonetheless a jolly good read Spring 1648When Thomas Hill, a quiet bookseller yes living in rural Hampshire, publishes a political pamphlet, he is arrested and forced onto a boat to Barbados and condemned to life and probably death as a slave War has erupted again in England When news of the king s execution reaches Barbados, political stability is threatened and a fleet commanded by Sir George Ayscue arrives to take control of the island for Cromwell But nothing turns out as planned Violence increases, the death toll mounts and the escape Thomas had been relying on seems everunlikely

  2. Mieneke says:

    The first book in the Thomas Hill series, The King s Spy , was one of the first books set during the English Civil War I read and it was certainly one that opened my eyes to this fascinating era of British history It also had a rather intriguing protagonist, a bookseller who was also a cryptographer I really enjoyed that first book, especially since Andrew Swanston gave the reader the opportunity to try her own hand at decrypting the messages, though to be honest, I am not made for these so The first book in the Thomas Hill series, The King s Spy , was one of the first books set during the English Civil War I read and it was certainly one that opened my eyes to this fascinating era of British history It also had a rather intriguing protagonist, a bookseller who was also a cryptographer I really enjoyed that first book, especially since Andrew Swanston gave the reader the opportunity to try her own hand at decrypting the messages, though to be honest, I am not made for these sorts of exercises, yet I still found it captivating The King s Exile, the second book in the series has languished on my TBR pile for a while, but when I finally opened it up it was very easy to get back into Thomas world The narrative was very different from last time, with far less puzzles and decrypting andsurviving and action, yet all the same very entertaining.The book is set in a very different locale than last time Instead of Oxford and Romsey, we follow Thomas to Barbados in the Caribbean Not only did this give Swanston the opportunity to show the corruption of Cromwell s Republic, but it also allows him to showcase that the Civil War didn t just affect England and its close neighbours such as Ireland and Scotland, but its colonies too I loved this emphasis as I d never really considered this and since we are usually shown the reverse position, where trouble in the colonies destabilises the situation at home The difference between the rigid, strict nature of Cromwellian society and therelaxed, less hidebound Barbadian planter society is shown and used to good effect, but Swanston doesn t paint Barbados as a paradise, in fact he stresses the horrid conditions slaves and indentures servants were forced to live and work in.One of my issues with The King s Spy was that it was somewhat heavy on exposition, with Thomas regularly lecturing people and by extension the reader on the topic of cryptography The King s Exile however is far less prone to info dumping and also less of a puzzle narrative in fact, decrypting doesn t come into play until very late in the book Instead, Thomas has to rely on his wits and courage to first survive the brutal journey to Barbados and then the awful treatment by his owners His trial and error explorations of edible fruits and philosophical approach to making sense of his situation were wonderful to read And we also see him applying his mind to accounting and military strategy, which leads to some interesting situations.Swanston has a very readable writing style and I loved the new characters we meet in this book My favourites were Mary Lyte, a young lady who has grown up on Barbados, and Patrick, a mulatto slave, who due to his education and wonderful personality is treatedlike an adoptive sibling than a servant Patrick is wonderful, but there was one thing that was hard for me to resolve and that is his complete peace with his existence I mean I can understand that his situation is about the best he could hope for short of being set free, but he doesn t even really seem to mind the fact that he is still a slave, however much he s loved That just felt odd to me Mary was amazing her free spirit and her determination to decide her own destiny and doing so regardless of what her brother thinks was fantastic and I love how Thomas is secretly rooting for her to get her way Another fantastic character whose iron spirit I loved was Thomas sister, Margaret I loved how strong she is and how self reliant Her pulling a gun on the man who is responsible for Thomas exile was a great scene.The King s Exile is a great sequel to The King s Spy, one that allows Swanston to prove that the cryptography included in the former wasn t just a gimmick and that he doesn t need it to write a compelling story Because The King s Exile is very much a character driven story and all the stronger for it Having enjoyed this book a lot, I m looking forward to getting my hands on The King s Return, the next book in the series which was published last month.This book was provided for review by the publisher

  3. Alissa McCarthy says:

    I found this in the Asia Books shop around the corner from my Bangkok hotel I like this shop quite a bit because it carries books by English authors whom I ve never heard of they never make it to the U.S For those English writers who are published in the U.S., I can often find their books first in Thailand long before they are available at home This book was the former written by the man who used to run Waterstone s the Barnes and Nobel of the U.K The main character is wrongfully exile I found this in the Asia Books shop around the corner from my Bangkok hotel I like this shop quite a bit because it carries books by English authors whom I ve never heard of they never make it to the U.S For those English writers who are published in the U.S., I can often find their books first in Thailand long before they are available at home This book was the former written by the man who used to run Waterstone s the Barnes and Nobel of the U.K The main character is wrongfully exiled, as an indentured servant, to Barbados in the Spring of 1648, just before King Charles I is executed Interesting social history about the island and the sugar rum slaves triangle A well written, delightful read

  4. Victoria says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here The second instalment of Thomas Hill Charles I is still at loggerheads with parliament, the English Civil War still in progress Thomas is arrested and taken to Winchester Gaol His crime writing a seditious pamphlet against parliament He isn t given a trial, just informed that he s to be deported out of England and sent to Barbados, as an indentured man He will be bought by planters, and put to work as a slave on a sugar plant Upon arrival, he asks to see a magistrate, claiming to be innoc The second instalment of Thomas Hill Charles I is still at loggerheads with parliament, the English Civil War still in progress Thomas is arrested and taken to Winchester Gaol His crime writing a seditious pamphlet against parliament He isn t given a trial, just informed that he s to be deported out of England and sent to Barbados, as an indentured man He will be bought by planters, and put to work as a slave on a sugar plant Upon arrival, he asks to see a magistrate, claiming to be innocent of the crime he is accused of It seems there s to be no justice for him though, as he is sold to a pair of brothers called Gibbes They treat him horribly Beat him, hurl abuse at him, threaten him etc He then discovers that they are in a partnership with his onetime enemy, Tobias Rush, who was supposed to be dead Rush was the man responsible for Thomas s arrest and deportation Now he has ceased Thomas s property at home, and threatened his family Thomas suddenly loses his temper, and lashes out at the brothers, injuring one of them in the process He escapes their land, and finds shelter with a local family, The Lytes They take him in, and promise to help him get home to England The civil war finds its way to Barbados, and Thomas finds himself helpful in decryption of letters Both the Gibbes, and also Rush end up dead Thomas is reunited with his family, and sails back to England I really couldn t enjoy this I find the author s writing to be so clumsy I don t feel like there s any development of characters, and I was actually quite bored I do have the third book in this series on my shelves, but I m not rushing to read it any time soon

  5. Kathleen Anne Pearson says:

    came across this book in a kindle listing I am an enthusiastic amateur historian with a particular interest in the Civil War so this was perfect I have since discovered that this is the second of a trilogy I was also interested to find that Romsey is the setting for the bookshop etc, Romsey is five miles up the road from me so I could happily identify the Love Lane references, although a little baffled by the Romsey School references at the end of the book I also have a little knowledge of came across this book in a kindle listing I am an enthusiastic amateur historian with a particular interest in the Civil War so this was perfect I have since discovered that this is the second of a trilogy I was also interested to find that Romsey is the setting for the bookshop etc, Romsey is five miles up the road from me so I could happily identify the Love Lane references, although a little baffled by the Romsey School references at the end of the book I also have a little knowledge of the Barbadian sugar plantations and with one landowner in particular who, incidentally, still owns said plantations to this day A good read sorry with believable characters I look forward to reading the other two books in the trilogy

  6. Mrs L E Clark says:

    Civil War and BarbadosEnjoyed the book and whilst I thought it was a little drawn out in places, learned a great deal of the effects of the Civil War on this small island During the blockade the tension was really good and at times couldn t put the book down.

  7. Rosie Lee says:

    I adored this book just as the first one and looking forward to read the final instalment

  8. Mart says:

    1.5 stars

  9. Frances says:

    Really interesting to read about the history of Barbados during the civil war I grew up in Barbados and we were never taught any of that.

  10. Sorcha says:

    Received in ebook format from www.netgalley.comIt was only after checking online that I realised that this was 2 in a series there has clearly been events in 1 that would explain why Thomas rapidly finds himself on a boat going to Barbados as an indentured servant, to work for two violent vicious thugs on a sugar plantation They are physically and verbally violent, mainly towards their betters and women Much of the violence is implied screams in the distance etc , with only the occasional Received in ebook format from www.netgalley.comIt was only after checking online that I realised that this was 2 in a series there has clearly been events in 1 that would explain why Thomas rapidly finds himself on a boat going to Barbados as an indentured servant, to work for two violent vicious thugs on a sugar plantation They are physically and verbally violent, mainly towards their betters and women Much of the violence is implied screams in the distance etc , with only the occasional slightlygraphical indication of events such as when boiling sugar strips away flesh from an unfortunate slave.Thomas spends his first two years working for the Gibbes brothers, whose threats of violence and occasional whipping seem to be enough to keep Thomas from escaping The threats allow for no interaction with the black slaves on the estate and there is only one mulatto from another estate who is educated and well spoken enough for no attempt to be made at a patois There are the occasional scenes of the Boiling room etc, but in every situation Thomas is on his own, with no interaction with the black slaves.Thomas escapes and takes refuge with another plantation owner and the next few years sees him recovering from his treatment and becoming a useful member to the plantation owners This is a difficult time for the inhabitants of Barbados, where news from England is slow to arrive and does not rapidly reflect the ever changing politics around the Monarchy and Oliver Cromwell s waning fortunes Politics seem to be at the mercy of the local inhabitants as much as what is going on in England.There are several bloody fights where people are protecting both their specific plantations, and the wider island against invaders It many instances people are dispatched in a bloody and violent manner Finally Thomas manages to reach his just rewards and return home with his family and rich andcontented man.My overall feeling was that it was very dispassionate and disconnected Whilst an interesting story, I wasn t really that engaged with the main character or any of the supporting people the most amusing and satisfying bit being the unmarried Mary s reasoning for not wanting to lose one of her legs as Charles likes the way my legs wrap around him The sister and nieces were so one dimensional as to be non entities I dont know if they wererounded in the previous book or will be in further books.This is a section of history that I don t know much about just what was the effect of the change in monarchy on the Slave Trade and the Colonies I m sure that the daily lives of all people working in the sugar trade wasbrutal and short as envisioned in this book So in short, a nice interlude of a story that wasnt a deep commentary on history or slavery but which had the opportunity of being so much