Hannas Töchter

Hannas Töchter Kindle ´ Paperback
  • Paperback
  • 381
  • Hannas Töchter
  • Marianne Fredriksson
  • German
  • 24 September 2019
  • 3596144868

About the Author: Marianne Fredriksson

Hannas Töchter Kindle ´ Paperback hannas kindle, töchter download, Hannas TöchterHannas Töchter eBookMarianne Fredriksson was a Swedish author who worked and lived in Roslagen and Stockholm Before becoming a novelist, she was a journalist on various Swedish newspapers and magazines, including Svenska DagbladetFredriksson published fifteen novels, most of which have been translated into English, German, Dutch and other languages Most of her earlier books are based on biblical stories A central theme in her writings is friendship because, as she maintained, friendship will beimportant than love in the future.


Hannas TöchterHannas Töchter Kindle ´ Paperback hannas kindle, töchter download, Hannas TöchterHannas Töchter eBookHanna, in einfachsten Verh ltnissen geboren, als der Hunger das Land heimsuchte mit ihr begann die Geschichte Johanna, die Tochter, die mit ihrem Mann das Haus am Meer baute warum ha te sie die b rgerliche Welt Anna, die Enkelin, die Journalistin folgt sie den Lebensspuren ihrer Familie, um sich der eigenen Biographie zu versichern Sensibel und kraftvoll zugleich erz hlt, einf hlsam und warmherzig Hannas T chter spiegelt in drei beeindruckenden Frauenschicksalen ein Jahrhundert schwedischer Geschichte.

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10 thoughts on “Hannas Töchter

  1. Corinne Edwards says:

    I m still reeling from the depth of this book Hanna s Daughters is a story of three generations of Swedish women, trying their hardest to find out who they are in a world that never seems to fit them completely Hanna, Johanna and Anna grandmother, mother and daughter, their lives winding through Swedish history war and famine, prosperity and vague pleasures, from a mountain cabin on a lake in the mid 1800s to the streets of modern G teborg.The narrative is both personal and real, each women I m still reeling from the depth of this book Hanna s Daughters is a story of three generations of Swedish women, trying their hardest to find out who they are in a world that never seems to fit them completely Hanna, Johanna and Anna grandmother, mother and daughter, their lives winding through Swedish history war and famine, prosperity and vague pleasures, from a mountain cabin on a lake in the mid 1800s to the streets of modern G teborg.The narrative is both personal and real, each women s experiences woven through everyone else s and we see each generation from the other s point of view I loved this book for its history and the appreciation I ve found for Sweden and its past, the class struggles and the people s desire to truly be a land of human rights I loved the book for its words an excellent translation that even gives you a sense of the rural dialect of the grandmother s family I loved the book for the reality of these women whose relationships are so familiar heartbreaking and poignant I didn t love that most of the men seemed either weak or dominating, but I also feel like I understand the characters enough to know why there were together and that the men did have much to offer these strong and struggling women.At times the chronology and unfamiliar names and geography got confusing, but I eventually felt I belong in this land of water and life I wished, sometimes, that their stories had been happier ones, but I think part of my love of this book is that they hard to find a way to work it out, despite their choices and circumstances And because their was so much difficulty, their epiphanies and those moments when things finally seemed clear became that much sweeter

  2. Cynthia says:

    I didn t get this book The book tells the life story of 3 women Hanna grandmother of Anna, mother to Joanna , Joanna other of Anna , and Anna living in Sweden What I liked about the book Hanna s lifestory was very interesting Born to a poor country family during the last half of 1800 s, Hanna s life was a grim struggle She was a servant for her uncle and cruel aunt She was raped, then viewed as a whore by the town, and had a boy by the time she was 13 years old Later she married the mil I didn t get this book The book tells the life story of 3 women Hanna grandmother of Anna, mother to Joanna , Joanna other of Anna , and Anna living in Sweden What I liked about the book Hanna s lifestory was very interesting Born to a poor country family during the last half of 1800 s, Hanna s life was a grim struggle She was a servant for her uncle and cruel aunt She was raped, then viewed as a whore by the town, and had a boy by the time she was 13 years old Later she married the mill owner and had 4children Despite all the hardships in her life, she just accepted it There was no whining or crying In fact she only cried in times of joy Joanna grew up in a city withmodern conveniences and felt embarrased by her mother s views and ways She strongly resented her mother at times However, despite different times and attitudes, all 3 women experienced similar difficulties, especially when it came to men.What I didn t like Anna s story and part of Joanna s story was just blah I thought the author was trying to make Anna should so deep and contemplative Example passionate love of her life cheats on her all the time, hurts her on purpose Anna goes on and on about her husband s cold mother, Anna s distance, her cold Joanna s mother in law was, how she somehow inheriting problems from her mother and grandmother, etc My assessment your husband is a cheating scumbag that can t keep his pants zipped I don t care how passionate you guys are, it s unhealthy

  3. Claire says:

    In it s original language the title was Anna, Hannah och Johanna The title in English is a little misleading, as I read Hanna s story and she continued to have one boy after the other, I did find myself wondering when she was going to have time to have girls, especially as she marries a much older man In fact Hanna has only daughter, Johanna, the same name as the daughter her husband lost and was still grieving for, from his first marriage Johanna would also have one daughter Anna, it she who In it s original language the title was Anna, Hannah och Johanna The title in English is a little misleading, as I read Hanna s story and she continued to have one boy after the other, I did find myself wondering when she was going to have time to have girls, especially as she marries a much older man In fact Hanna has only daughter, Johanna, the same name as the daughter her husband lost and was still grieving for, from his first marriage Johanna would also have one daughter Anna, it she who begins to tell this story, she visits her mother in hospital, desperate to get answers to questions she s left it too late to ask She had lost her memory four years ago, then only a few months later her words had disappeared She could see and hear, but could name neither objects nor people, so they lost all meaning.Anna knows she is being demanding like a child, willing her mother to understand and respond, reprimanded by the care staff for upsetting her, for although she can t respond, she is vulnerable to the joys and anxieties of those around her and powerless to prevent the dreams that carry her each night back to the world of her childhood, that place her daughter is trying to penetrate.Anna finds an old photograph of her grandmother Hanna and recognises similarities she s not been aware of, she remembers her briefly, and asking her mother Why isn t she a proper Gran Whose lap you can sit on and who tells stories And her mother s voice She s old and tired, Anna She s had enough of children And there was never any time for stories in her life The narrative then shifts back to Hanna s childhood, born in 1871, the eldest of a second group of children born, the first four died in the famine of the 1860 s What the mother learned from the previous deaths was never to get fond of the new child And to fear dirt and bad air.The first half of the book is dedicated to Hanna and life and this is where the novel is at its best, immersed in the struggle of Hanna s early years, its tragic turning point and the situation she must accept as a result Circumstances that will become buried deep, that nevertheless leave their impression on how she is in the world.The mid section zooms in on her grand daughter Anna s adult life, charmed by a man with womanizing tendencies, but of a generation that refuses to accept an unbearable situation, one where women are able to be financially independent and greater decision makers Naturally I thought it was love driving me into Donald s arms In my generation, we were obsessed with a longing for a grand passion Hanna, you would ve understood nothing whatsoever about love of that kind In your day, love hadn t penetrated from the upper classes to the depths of peasantry.Finally Johanna s life with her husband Arne, the good fortune that comes into her life, the trials that follow, of a different nature than her mother s, though not so far from her grandmother s though she probably knew nothing of that loss The second half of the book was less memorable for me, possibly because Hanna s story created such a strong sense of place and life in that era was full of dramatic events which underpinned the development of the characters When the family moves to Goteborg, to the city and its ways, when the automobile arrives and travels shortens distances, life tended to becomeuniform, less distinct.Marianne Fredriksson in the opening pages of the novel reflects on something she learned at school, when Bible studies were still part of the curriculum, that the sins of the fathers are inflicted on children into the third and fourth generations She felt that was terribly unjust, primitive and ridiculous, growing up, the first generation to be raised to be independent , those who were to take destiny into their own hands Then as knowledge developed and understanding of the importance of our social and psychological inheritance grew, those words began to acquire new meaning, and though there were none that spoke about the actions of mothers, here she found it to havemeaning.We inherit patterns, behaviour and ways of reacting to a much greater extent than we like to admit It has not been easy to adapt to so much has been forgotten , disappearing into the subconscious when grandparents left farms and countryside where the family had lived for generations.She goes on to say that ancient patterns are passed on from mothers to daughters, who have daughters and that perhaps here too we might find some explanation for why women have found it so difficult to stick up for themselves and make use of the rights an equal society has to offer

  4. Laurel-Rain says:

    Three generations of Swedish women whose lives are linked through a century of great love and great loss vividly people this family saga.Told from the points of view of Hanna, her daughter Johanna, and granddaughter Anna, Hanna s Daughters A Novel is a spellbinding tale that almost immediately grabs the reader.In the beginning, we meet Johanna, suffering from Alzheimer s disease, and visited by her daughter Anna, a writer who is divorced from her husband Rikard and is the mother of two daught Three generations of Swedish women whose lives are linked through a century of great love and great loss vividly people this family saga.Told from the points of view of Hanna, her daughter Johanna, and granddaughter Anna, Hanna s Daughters A Novel is a spellbinding tale that almost immediately grabs the reader.In the beginning, we meet Johanna, suffering from Alzheimer s disease, and visited by her daughter Anna, a writer who is divorced from her husband Rikard and is the mother of two daughters We are privy to some of her struggles as an independent woman who feels as though her mother has slipped away before she has even begun to know her.The author then shares Hanna s journey with us, from the late 1800s in Sweden At twelve she is raped by the son of the family she is in service to pregnant and giving birth at thirteen, she is treated as a fallen woman Then an older man, a miller, comes to the village and falls for her He takes her son Ragnar as his own Together they run the mill, create a home, and have severalchildren before Johanna is born There are losses along the way, but Hanna feels grateful that she has been spared the fate of continued service to other families.Her daughter Johanna is considered bright and gifted with words, but Hanna s way with her daughter is to share very little of her own thoughts and feelings and to convey the need for self effacement Johanna, however, has her own ideas She becomes a spirited activist in her day, and when she marries, she chooses someone she feels something for.By the time Anna is born, times and expectations have changed She is even granted higher education These advances do not guarantee a happy life or a fulfilling marriage There are issues and problems She struggles But through it all, she has her strength, her education, and a rich history behind her of strong women prevailing in the face of struggle.These characters seemed very familiar to me Of course I realized that they might, as my own mother and grandmother were Swedish, and my grandmother immigrated to America on her own when she was twenty She carried with her the traditions of the Old Country, and her heavy accent followed her throughout her life In some ways, I could see some of my grandmother s history in these characters, but Hanna and her descendants stayed in Sweden and saw their country change before their eyes The younger generations applauded the changes, but the older ones clung to their traditional ways.I loved this story, so rich in history, but layered with feelings I will remember it for a long time The story, with its back and forth movement between the past and the present, felt appropriate and almost seemed like a collective venture between the women Some of the themes of magic and mysticism felt very natural, as well There was one part of the story I could especially relate to In the beginning, Hanna sets up house with furniture she picks out, with one item being especially significant to her a sofa she calls the Varmland sofa, derived from its origins This sofa holds center stage, even during the times it is in the attic because it does not fit anywhere She carries it with her throughout her life, and it seems to represent and symbolize permanence and identity for Hanna.A book I would recommend to women who enjoy family sagas and historic backdrops five stars

  5. Heidi says:

    What a great book It was amazing to see how much change took place over the course of these three women s lives and also how much stayed the same I love the superstitious little things that were in there too I love how all the men think the women are filled with secrets and the women are surprised when they hear this.

  6. Calzean says:

    The book has its moments as it described the life of Hanna born 1871 in the north of Sweden , her daughter and granddaughter.There is some insight into life in Sweden, the harshness of life in the 1800s 1900s and the gradual improvement in living conditions.The language to me was a bit flat and the characters were quite bland.

  7. Dev says:

    Hanna, Johanna, and Anna I could not keep them straight and neither will you pass on this one.

  8. Reka Paul says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Pleasant read but I really cannot befriend the whole jumping around from different narrators and narrative styles in this book, it was quite annoying at points and not very well balanced Also I did not buy the whole men are horrible but we have to love them anyways red thread, especially Rickard was despicable, betraying her like that in front of their friends while she was pregnant, just utterly repulsive and then it was all her fault because she never listened to him That was supposed to be Pleasant read but I really cannot befriend the whole jumping around from different narrators and narrative styles in this book, it was quite annoying at points and not very well balanced Also I did not buy the whole men are horrible but we have to love them anyways red thread, especially Rickard was despicable, betraying her like that in front of their friends while she was pregnant, just utterly repulsive and then it was all her fault because she never listened to him That was supposed to be the already the improvement to the earlier living generations with women getting hit or being outcast Somehow I feel like the author wanted to make this point really way to hard and at the same time did simply not convince me.However it was fun to read and the descriptions of the Swedish cities and landscapes were quite nice

  9. Lori Espino says:

    I loved this book The three women spanning such different times were so interesting and the way it s written is so engrossing.

  10. BellaGBear says:

    Anna wants to know the women she came from, who shaped her After she finds an old picture of her grandmother, Hanna, the perspective of the book shifts and we learn about Hanna s childhood Her family was incredibly poor The tiny village by the lake where they live was struck by famine and only slowly recovered while Hanna grew up When she was twelve and worked on her uncle s farm, she was violently raped by her cousin and became pregnant with a little boy The girl and her son couldn t Anna wants to know the women she came from, who shaped her After she finds an old picture of her grandmother, Hanna, the perspective of the book shifts and we learn about Hanna s childhood Her family was incredibly poor The tiny village by the lake where they live was struck by famine and only slowly recovered while Hanna grew up When she was twelve and worked on her uncle s farm, she was violently raped by her cousin and became pregnant with a little boy The girl and her son couldn t count on pity from the harsh, taciturn villagers she was deemed a whore and her son a bastard until a widowed miller, moved there from another region, saw fit to marry her With her husband, she gotchildren three sons and a little daughter The girl is called Johanna, and she will be Anna s mother I think part of the attraction of this book is that Fredriksson is clearly aware that people, specifically women, are so connected in the things they feel and are and think For centuries, certain images and pieces of wisdom and character traits have been given from parents to their children Religion in the village by the lake, for instance, is a strange mixture of different strands of Christianity and remains of ancient beliefs rune witchcraft, and widespread but secret superstitions This eclectic mixture is not judged in the book, nor is it romanticised Fredriksson seldom does your thinking for you It is however one of the many story elements that show how everything we do has its roots in an exponential amount of people that have gone before us Whatever the characters go through, there is something comforting in that thought that runs through the book.There are few relationshipscomplex than those between mothers and daughters Fredriksson draws out all the little spoken and unspoken things that happen between the three generations of women with so much nuance and softness The women learn how to hate, how to hope, how to criticize, how to forgive and how to grow old To create three full, complete women s lives with all their contradictions, faults and virtues in only 400 pages is something few authors can accomplish.It s refreshing to read a book that is so completely driven by female characters However, Fredriksson does have the tendency to blame everything that goes wrong in her characters lives on their mothers A husband cheats on his wife because of his distant mother, a boy becomes a rapist because of his doting mother, the main characters inability to talk about their feelings is inherited from generation on generation I forgive Fredriksson for this because of how much love and support exists between the women also, but I don t agree with her All daughters resemble their mothers to a certain degree, but it s not fair to trace every shortcoming back to our parents and if we do, our fathers ought to shoulder some of the blameThis is only part of the review written by the lovely Jo Read the full review at Bookworms United