Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Criticism

Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of
  • Paperback
  • 342
  • Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Criticism
  • Paul De Man
  • English
  • 09 January 2018
  • 0816611351

About the Author: Paul De Man

Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of blindness pdf, insight: ebok, essays pdf, rhetoric epub, contemporary pdf, criticism mobile, Blindness and epub, Insight: Essays pdf, Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Criticismand Insight: Essays ebok, and Insight: Essays in the download, Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Criticism PDFPaul de Man was a Belgian born deconstructionist Insight: Essays PDF/EPUB » literary critic and theoristHe began teaching at Bard College Later, he completed his PhD at Harvard University in the late s He then taught at Cornell University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Zurich, before ending up on the faculty in French and Comparative Literature at Yale University, where he was considered part of the Yale School of deconstructionAt the time of his death from cancer, he was Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale After his death, the discovery of some two hundred Blindness and Kindle - articles he wrote during World War II for collaborationist newspapers, including one explicitly anti Semitic, caused a scandal and provoked a reconsideration of his life and work De Man oversaw the dissertations of both Gayatri Spivak and Barbara Johnson.


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10 thoughts on “Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Criticism

  1. Christian Haines says:

    De Man is often merely lumped together with Derrida, Miller, and others aas representatives of Deconstruction There is a certain truth to this, but it is perhapsuseful to think of De Man in terms of a turn towards or return to rhetoric Rhetoric is that material element of language consisting of tropes that makes attempts to abstract an interpretation of a text from the language of the text impossible or always already a failure The essays in this volume are each an intervention into v De Man is often merely lumped together with Derrida, Miller, and others aas representatives of Deconstruction There is a certain truth to this, but it is perhapsuseful to think of De Man in terms of a turn towards or return to rhetoric Rhetoric is that material element of language consisting of tropes that makes attempts to abstract an interpretation of a text from the language of the text impossible or always already a failure The essays in this volume are each an intervention into various tendencies in then contemporary criticism Lukacs, New Criticism, Derrida, etc They each orient the reader towards the relation between reader and text, especially towards the abstractions or assumptions or jumps that each interpreter tends to make One of the main themes this volume is the questioning of the possibility of literary history De Man sees literature as an art that aims for presence, for an immediacy that it cannot but fail to achieve From this, he will argue, it follows that a literary history intent on spreading literature over an axis leading from past to future a genetic history necessarily misses the object of literature I am not sure that I accept his argument, but De Man s opening up of the problem of history is a significant project see others like F Jameson, S Greenblatt, H White etc for similar if opposed missions One last note while many claim that Deconstruction is purely negative, that it takes interpretation apart without contributing anything interesting or significant, this not only neglects how important posing new questions is but also the complexity and potential of the field of rhetoric that it reopened

  2. Terry Tsurugi says:

    I just reread this book after a gap of about 15 years it s probably at least my sixth time rereading Rhetoric of Temporality It s muchdifficult following De Man s arguments all the way through now that I m no longer a fresh young student Also, the long passages of untranslated French and German quotes are a stumbling block, since I m pretty rusty in both of those languages Despite these difficulties, De Man is still the most interesting and inspiring writer on literature I ve ever r I just reread this book after a gap of about 15 years it s probably at least my sixth time rereading Rhetoric of Temporality It s muchdifficult following De Man s arguments all the way through now that I m no longer a fresh young student Also, the long passages of untranslated French and German quotes are a stumbling block, since I m pretty rusty in both of those languages Despite these difficulties, De Man is still the most interesting and inspiring writer on literature I ve ever read, and this is one of my favorite collections of his work

  3. Lobstergirl says:

    This paragraph in an essay by Louis Menand in the 3 24 14 New Yorker aroused my interest in this 1971 collection of De Man s writings Most people would agree that one of the things that make literature different from philosophy and self help books is that in nonliterary texts rhetorical devices and figures of speech are incidental to the meaning, and in literary texts that sort of language metaphors, symbols, allegories, all the forms and styles of fiction are sources of meaning We don t re This paragraph in an essay by Louis Menand in the 3 24 14 New Yorker aroused my interest in this 1971 collection of De Man s writings Most people would agree that one of the things that make literature different from philosophy and self help books is that in nonliterary texts rhetorical devices and figures of speech are incidental to the meaning, and in literary texts that sort of language metaphors, symbols, allegories, all the forms and styles of fiction are sources of meaning We don t read literature literally We assume that what is meant isthan, or other than, what the words literally say This is the belief that de Man complicated as he also complicated the belief that philosophical writing is fundamentally not figurative and rhetorical.At this point though I either have to abort the mission, or find the Cliff s Notes for this book

  4. Ellen says:

    Blindness serves as Paul de Man s trope for cognition Our acts of interpretation necessarily result in spatialization, the formation of gaps, as we literally only see certain parts of the text The blindness enables our insight, for if all were foregrounded, nothing would be foregrounded The only complete representation of the text is its replication De Man depicts the lateral movement of interpretation by the term allegory His use of allegory differs from its usual thematic connotations Blindness serves as Paul de Man s trope for cognition Our acts of interpretation necessarily result in spatialization, the formation of gaps, as we literally only see certain parts of the text The blindness enables our insight, for if all were foregrounded, nothing would be foregrounded The only complete representation of the text is its replication De Man depicts the lateral movement of interpretation by the term allegory His use of allegory differs from its usual thematic connotations such as the didacticism seen in Everyman and refers instead to allegory s narrative impulse a fragmented, metonymic, contiguous and diachronic passage along a horizontal axis.Significantly, the writer who is simultaneously reading his her own text and s he writes it similarly highlights and represses what s he is trying to represent In the process of narrative, like music, langugage is a diachronic system of relationships De Man sees literary language, then, caught it a double blind, its blindness inscribed into the very act of writing of revelation itself

  5. Ned says:

    The best essays in this collection are an elegant foray into the nature of reading, challenging established approaches to textual analysis De Man s sparkling intelligence and depth makes this an essential work for understanding deconstruction, particularly in its early American incarnation The most moving thing about engaging with De Man is that he forces you to question every preconception, opening up new and previously unimaginable avenues of thought.

  6. Jared Colley says:

    Another great collection of essays from one of the best readers of literature.There is an interesting engagement with Derrida in this volume involving both figures readings of Rousseau.

  7. Courtney Watson says:

    Blah But then, I really dislike literary criticism.

  8. Sean says:

    De Man is capable of some really fine readings, but it seems like success comes at the roll of the dice with his method, and I m just not sold on deconstructionism.