Basti

Basti Kindle ´ Paperback
    IGNOU M.Com Study Material, IGNOU Books, Free Download ages spoke around in the voices of birds, how astonished he was that everything was so new and yet looked so old so the book begins, with a mythic, even mystic, vision of harmony, as the hero, Zakir, looks back on his childhood in a subcontinent that had not yet been divided between Muslims and Hindus But Zakir is abruptly evicted from this paradise real or imagined into the maelstrom of history The new country of Pakistan is born, separating him once and for all from the woman he loves, and in a jagged and jarring sequence of scenes we witness a nation and a psyche torn into existence only to be torn apart again and again by political, religious, economic, linguistic, personal, and sexual conflicts in effect, a world of loneliness Zakir, whose name means remember, serves as the historian of this troubled place, while the ties he maintains across the years with old friends friends who run into one another in caf s and on corners and the odd other places where history takes a time out suggest that the possibility of reconciliation is not simply a dream The characters wait for a sign that minds and hearts may still meet In the meantime, the dazzling artistry of Basti itself gives us reason to hope against hope."/>
  • Paperback
  • 224
  • Basti
  • Intizar Husain
  • English
  • 03 August 2018
  • 1590175824

About the Author: Intizar Husain

Basti Kindle ´ Paperback basti kindle, BastiBasti eBookIntizar Husain was a journalist, short story writer, and novelist, widely considered one of the most significant fiction writers in Urdu Born in Dibai, Bulandshahr, in British administered India, he migrated to Pakistan in and lived in Lahore Besides Basti, he was the author of two other novels, Naya Gar The New House , which paints a picture of Pakistan during the ten year dictatorship of the Islamic fundamentalist General Zia ul Haq, and Agay Sumandar Hai Beyond Is the Sea , which juxtaposes the spiraling urban violence of contemporary Karachi with a vision of the lost Islamic realm of al Andalus Collections of Husain s celebrated short stories have appeared in English under the titles Leaves, The Seventh Door, A Chronicle of the Peacocks, and An Unwritten Epic.


BastiBasti Kindle ´ Paperback basti kindle, BastiBasti eBookBasti is the great Pakistani novel, a beautifully written, brilliantly inventive reckoning with the violent history of a country whose turbulence, ambitions, and uncertainties increasingly concern the whole world In Urdu, basti means any space, from the most intimate to the most universal, in which groups of people come together to try to live together, and the universal question at the heart of the book is how to constitute a common world What brings people together What tears them apart When the world was still all new, when the sky was fresh and the earth not yet soiled, when trees breathed through centuries and ages spoke around in the voices of birds, how astonished he was that everything was so new and yet looked so old so the book begins, with a mythic, even mystic, vision of harmony, as the hero, Zakir, looks back on his childhood in a subcontinent that had not yet been divided between Muslims and Hindus But Zakir is abruptly evicted from this paradise real or imagined into the maelstrom of history The new country of Pakistan is born, separating him once and for all from the woman he loves, and in a jagged and jarring sequence of scenes we witness a nation and a psyche torn into existence only to be torn apart again and again by political, religious, economic, linguistic, personal, and sexual conflicts in effect, a world of loneliness Zakir, whose name means remember, serves as the historian of this troubled place, while the ties he maintains across the years with old friends friends who run into one another in caf s and on corners and the odd other places where history takes a time out suggest that the possibility of reconciliation is not simply a dream The characters wait for a sign that minds and hearts may still meet In the meantime, the dazzling artistry of Basti itself gives us reason to hope against hope.

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10 thoughts on “Basti

  1. Zanna says:

    My first and last journey with her We left Vyaspur before dawn, but when the lorry reached Bulandshahr it was already afternoon As we crossed over the Ganges on the bridge, darkness fell Somehow, at some point, her hand came into mine From then on I was unconcerned about the dust and ruts in the road, and about when the lorry would arrive in Rupnagar, and even about whether it would arrive at allIsn t this the truth perfectly, how that half secret love can swallow your whole self, how some My first and last journey with her We left Vyaspur before dawn, but when the lorry reached Bulandshahr it was already afternoon As we crossed over the Ganges on the bridge, darkness fell Somehow, at some point, her hand came into mine From then on I was unconcerned about the dust and ruts in the road, and about when the lorry would arrive in Rupnagar, and even about whether it would arrive at allIsn t this the truth perfectly, how that half secret love can swallow your whole self, how some small touch, even a word, can obliterate time and dissolve every thought in your headWhat I loved about this book was, above all, its tenderness Like other borderland literature, Basti renders lines drawn on a map as an emotional geography that blurs them Here you will not find a history that steps from event to event explaining the cause and effect of each We don t hear news, only that the beloved one reads it, or that it is discussed by friends in the cafe I don t mean that politics or history are sidestepped rather the opposite, we are inside them in a way that makes it impossible to look down on the situation from above Yar He paused, then said somewhat hesitantly, Yar, was it good that Pakistan was created After this fatal question is asked, the text starts to fragment Zakir becomes a stranger to himself he cannot even walk without thinking there is something wrong with his walk, that he is losing his identity Finally some coherence returns when he hears from his friend Surendar in Delhi about Sabirah the one he loves.Yar, how strange it is that the same town becomes for one of its inhabitants, who has left the country,meaningful than before, so that he dreams about it while for another inhabitant all its meaning disappears, so that even though s he s in the same country, s he never feels any desire to see the town againThe town where he and Sabirah lived as children is deeply important to Zakir, but Sabirah, who stayed in India while her family left, feels differently Here I feel not only the loss of the beloved place, but the loss he feels in that discontinuity with her, that something precious to him has been thrown away If Rupnagar appears idyllic in his memory, then Lahore by implication, never mentioned appears nightmarish in a time of war, but tenderness makes it home I can do nothing else for this city, but I can pray, and I do pray In my mind is a prayer for Rupnagar and its people as well, for I can no longer imagine Rupnagar apart from this city Rupnagar and this city have merged together inside me, and become one town.Inside Zakir, the broken world can begin to be repaired It seems to me that Hussein is refusing to partition his own self by drawing on Hindu and Buddhist sources as well as the Quran and Iranian poets When the slogan Crush India appears on taxis it is startling, because we have not left India in spirit, the movement, the crossing, is from a child s paradise to adult sorrow and loss the mood is grief above all But love is the bridge friendship ignores religious differences and nation state boundaries entirely Love dissolves the border like chalk pictures erased by rain Love is primary in Basti and everything flows from it, even when it is only a shadow of a memory of a touch

  2. Tony says:

    So, my last read was The Siege of Krishnapur, about the 1857 Indian Mutiny The author, J.G Farrell, skewers the British, but except for two characters kept in a cage, he doesn t really personalize the native Indians This, Basti, seemed a logical next step.Intizar Husain was born in British administered India and migrated to Pakistan in 1947 He lived through the Partition and the following war This novel, to the extent it is historical, is about that time Yet, there are remembrances to 18 So, my last read was The Siege of Krishnapur, about the 1857 Indian Mutiny The author, J.G Farrell, skewers the British, but except for two characters kept in a cage, he doesn t really personalize the native Indians This, Basti, seemed a logical next step.Intizar Husain was born in British administered India and migrated to Pakistan in 1947 He lived through the Partition and the following war This novel, to the extent it is historical, is about that time Yet, there are remembrances to 1857, a bell tolling both a banner and a scar And let us not forget Jallianwala Bagh, a park, in 1919, where a crowd of nonviolent nationalist demonstrators were trapped in a walled garden and repeatedly fired upon by soldiers under a British general, leaving hundreds dead.Zakir the he of this novel keeps going to the garden He makes friends with the trees Or finds peace Momentary peace.Zakir s father gives Zakir some keys They are the keys to their house in India None of them will go back there Son, these are the keys to a house to which you no longer have any right And then he dies Such are legacies.But I don t want to talk about the book, not really I want to talk about meor maybe you.See, there are a few things I know a great deal about, or pretend I do Munich I know who lied I know who was weak I know it so well that when I read a book about a family outing, I can tell they are really talking about the outset of war, even if, you know, they are not And whether I m right or not, the symbolic burp is casual and reflexive.But I don t have that with the Partition I don t really know who the good guys and the bad guys are Husain doesn t tell us either, at least not by teams, just individuals Young men who enter the Shiraz, drink your tea, and act tough, then change sides.So I read this as an American As a non believer I read this as a pacifist, and an isolationist, though I suspect the latter is foolish I read this as someone whose understanding of that moment in time is limited I read this as someone who thinks you need look no further than religion and colonialism to see why, today, the world is set to explode And I read this because a character in The Siege of Krishnapur said, you have to be very careful thrashing a Hindu, George, because they have very weak chests and you can kill them Much of this was lost on me So much the better, because that signals a start.Yet, so much resonated Without any sense of boredom he read so many posters with the same message, and so many two word slogans written in English on car bumpers, on car windows He felt he was not reading slogans, but walking on flies.Next is The Dying Grass, because there is Katyn Forest, and Jallianwala Bagh, and Wounded Knee and.I am walking on flies

  3. PS says:

    So beautiful, I need time to process it Review to come

  4. Zaki says:

    Original Review Intizar Hussain migrated from India to Pakistan after Indian partition He lived in the crucial age in which relationship between India and Pakistan became tense and both countries moved away from each other, instead of reconciling, as envisioned by the leadership of both countries and wished by the public This book revolves around these two themes partition and war Intizar Hussain is concerned with how these changes affect the psychology of common people He doesn t go in th Original Review Intizar Hussain migrated from India to Pakistan after Indian partition He lived in the crucial age in which relationship between India and Pakistan became tense and both countries moved away from each other, instead of reconciling, as envisioned by the leadership of both countries and wished by the public This book revolves around these two themes partition and war Intizar Hussain is concerned with how these changes affect the psychology of common people He doesn t go in the debate of right or wrong, but deals with how it affected the lives of common people By using the tools of love and friendship, he connects people of both sides Apparent differences can t separate people No matter how big the change is, people are connected with one another in a complex way and that big change can t break those connections Nostalgia is also one of the themes of this book, our protagonist wants to go back to his hometown where he spent his childhood, he wants to visit those streets, he wants to meet his lover, but he couldn t do due to imminent war The war destroys the beauty of his new town, as well Intizar Hussain isconcerned with the cultural history of this area He talks about Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism He talks about the ghaddar of 1857 and the rulers of subcontinent from the ancient times to the modern times This shows he sconcerned with those things which connect people, not separate them Intizar Hussain is a great story teller, as well Through stories, he teaches big lessons in a very simple and beautiful way Particularly the story of elephant and tortoise tells us what India and Pakistan are doing to each other The themes of love, whether romantic or platonic are beautifully depicted in this book The way he describes his love for nature, trees, animals, and birds is beyond description He is actually connected with the land He skillfully portrays that you can physically leave a place but mentally you remain there In short, intizar Hussain deals with everything that affects the life of a common man.P.S And when Zakir reminisces Those were good days, good and sincere I ought to remember those days, or in fact I ought to write them down, for fear I should forget them again And the days afterward Them too, so I can know how the goodness and sincerity gradually died out from the days, how the days came to be filled with misfortune and nights with ill omen Literally, this is the postcolonial condition described here so beautifully, so poetically how the initial hope and excitement slowly fades away when reality sets in

  5. Nicholas During says:

    This book reads like a creation myth, and when it s the creation of the state of Pakistan, you d better pay some attention, and be prepared to get a bit depressed Though actually this is beautiful book, filled with lyrical memories of exploration in time, place, and faith Loaded with Manicheist imagery of father vs son, brother vs brother yes, Cain and Abel , religion vs religion, town vs city, you get the point, it feels like you are in a crucible of a new world, and though a reader with This book reads like a creation myth, and when it s the creation of the state of Pakistan, you d better pay some attention, and be prepared to get a bit depressed Though actually this is beautiful book, filled with lyrical memories of exploration in time, place, and faith Loaded with Manicheist imagery of father vs son, brother vs brother yes, Cain and Abel , religion vs religion, town vs city, you get the point, it feels like you are in a crucible of a new world, and though a reader without a strong understanding of Pakistani history will get confused, the characters themselves live in a world of confusion where the question What s going to happen is asked over and over again and no one can answer it with any certainty Often the characters don t know who they are, especially the protagonist Zakir, or where they are, or when they are, as they spin through the history of Pakistan and India and all across the subcontinent Entering into the myriad myths that have created their current culture, though, as anyone who reads the newspapers know, not without its negative effects But it isn t just a loose mythic and mystic I m stealing from the back copy here introduction to a complex history and culture It is also a very clear, very real invocation of living in a war torn city, Lahore in 1971 to be exact, to be in a place that alternates between the shouts and shots on the streets to the quiet nights of curfew and black out Where each morning the city you ve live is unrecognizable Where you radical communist friends became Islamists seemingly overnight or after a visit to the US and the only escape is in memory and in the past And yes, it does have a Proustian feel to it, as Zakir continually returns to his hometown and hometown friends, an ideal India where religions and people freely mixed and one could quote the Koran and the Ramchandar ji in the same sentence, and no one would blink an eye.If you are interested in South Asian history, and South Asian literary, this book is a must read It s wonderfully written, moving but dense, and I at least left it with a deeper sympathy, I hope understanding, for the travails of a large and important place and all the people over the generations who have lived there

  6. Shumail Hassan says:

    Minds are overwhelmed by the war signifying restless masses especially the protagonist, Zakir, who seems to be at loggerheads with himself and with the rationale around War has benumbed these people, the people having affiliations with religion, with revolution while some with the inherent relationships they hold with humans, with landscapings, with nature Hence, Intizar s nostalgia hits time and again with so many historical, religious and socio cultural elements that reader is taken into th Minds are overwhelmed by the war signifying restless masses especially the protagonist, Zakir, who seems to be at loggerheads with himself and with the rationale around War has benumbed these people, the people having affiliations with religion, with revolution while some with the inherent relationships they hold with humans, with landscapings, with nature Hence, Intizar s nostalgia hits time and again with so many historical, religious and socio cultural elements that reader is taken into the study of these people s lives forcibly The writer has, so exceptionally, done justice to plot and so mesmerisingly knitted the storyline that reader keeps on turning the pages from cover to cover This orphic pen is well conversant with pure Hindi origins of these people and their historical, psychological affinities for their land without any malaise This remains a masterpiece I have ever read in Urdu fiction not only because this is one of the very few attempts at putting down people s history unplugged from wonted political whatabout ery

  7. Sorayya Khan says:

    This innovative novel has its own style part plot, part memory, part dream, part mythology Although its backdrop is Partition, the novel is extraordinary in its rendering of waiting for war The historical moment is 1971 and the brutal war out of which Bangladesh was born It s a story of place, from Lahore, Delhi, Dhaka, and others to Rupnagar and Vyaspur, imagined villages central to the sorrows of this story The story moves from one location to the next, as it does from the present to va This innovative novel has its own style part plot, part memory, part dream, part mythology Although its backdrop is Partition, the novel is extraordinary in its rendering of waiting for war The historical moment is 1971 and the brutal war out of which Bangladesh was born It s a story of place, from Lahore, Delhi, Dhaka, and others to Rupnagar and Vyaspur, imagined villages central to the sorrows of this story The story moves from one location to the next, as it does from the present to various moments in the past The book is translated from Intizar Husain s Urdu by Frances Pritchett who says, My goal has not been to make the characters sound like Americans I want a careful balance sentences that are within the range of standard English, but a rhythm that retains the flow of Urdu I want the reader to have an agreeable double experience to realize through the semitransparent medium of English that people from a different culture are living their own lives, not ours While the sentences swim in Urdu like fish in a sea, in English I want them at least to swim like fish in a well designed aquarium Even in translation, the story is transportative, capturing a rhythm of different worlds and different times, but presenting a familiar melancholy of loss and loneliness and .There are several gorgeous passages They had left their cities, but they carried their cities with them, as a trust, on their shoulders That s how it usually is Even when cities are left behind, they don t stay behind They seize on you evenWhen the earth slips out from under your feet, that s when it really surrounds youIn a letter written by Surendar to Zakir, Come and see the city of Delhi, and the realm of beauty, for both are waiting for you Come and join them, before silver fills the part in her hair, and your head becomes a drift of snow, and our lives are merely a story That s all A line of dialogue, spoken by Irfan But it s not your fault, that s the state the newspapers are in nowadays Once they used to publicize the news, now they conceal the news in any case, may God have mercy, things don t look good The opening sentence, When the world was still all new, when the sky was fresh and the earth was not yet soiled, when trees breathed through the centuries and ages spoke in the voices of birds, how astonished he was, looking all around, that everything was so new, and yet looked so old And in the opening, a child wonders Maulana, when will Doomsday come When the mosquito dies, and the cow is free of fear When will the mosquito die, and hwne will the cow be free of fear When the sun rises in the west When will the sun rise in the west When the hen crows, and the rooster is mute When will the hen crow, and when will the rooster be mute When will those who can speak fall silent, and when will shoelaces speak When the rulers grow cruel, and the people lick the dust After one when a second when, after a second when a third when A strange maze of whens Then whens that had passed away, the Whens that were yet to come What whens and whens Bhagat ji recalled, what whens and whens were illumined in Abba Jan s imagination The world semed to be an endless chain of whens When and when and when

  8. Faaiz says:

    I read the translated version ofBastiand not the original in Urdu I hope to be able to read that one day.As far as the current translated book is concerned, I just didn t find it as compelling and evocative as I would ve hoped it would be I think a lot was lost in translation here and I often tried to imagine what the Urdu version of what I was reading would ve sounded like I found the writing and prose to be stiff, muddled and obscured like there was a layer, or veil, between what was I read the translated version ofBastiand not the original in Urdu I hope to be able to read that one day.As far as the current translated book is concerned, I just didn t find it as compelling and evocative as I would ve hoped it would be I think a lot was lost in translation here and I often tried to imagine what the Urdu version of what I was reading would ve sounded like I found the writing and prose to be stiff, muddled and obscured like there was a layer, or veil, between what was written and what was meant to be conveyed, like the author was holding back on me and being guarded Most of all what irked me was the constant barrage of dreams, imagined fantastical scenarios and sequences from which transition back to the current wasn t always smooth and their relevance was lost on me Also, the characterizations were puzzling, it was as though the protagonist and the supporting cast of characters were in a sort of arrested development with childlike naivety and without a strong or well formulated characterization, personalities or traits I wonder if that is intentional in that the constant disorientation of the plot and the characters is meant to convey a postcolonial condition borne out of trauma, and a repeated trauma in particular Still, the whole thing seemed underwhelming and a bit dull really.People seem to like it I guess this just wasn t for me

  9. Susan says:

    In an effort to readbooks set outside of North America and from different perspectives, I ve recently read Basti, a story told by a west Pakistan man which spans the 1971 war between Pakistan and India, Originally written in Urdu, the book is interwoven with religious and cultural references to Hindi, Christianity, and Islamic texts and stories Very evocative and a fine glimpse into another culture Accoding to Aamir Mufti, who writes on the back cover, Urdu is the strangely homeless la In an effort to readbooks set outside of North America and from different perspectives, I ve recently read Basti, a story told by a west Pakistan man which spans the 1971 war between Pakistan and India, Originally written in Urdu, the book is interwoven with religious and cultural references to Hindi, Christianity, and Islamic texts and stories Very evocative and a fine glimpse into another culture Accoding to Aamir Mufti, who writes on the back cover, Urdu is the strangely homeless language produced out of interactions between the vernacular of north India and those of the Islamic Near East, Persian and Arabic in particular

  10. Nikhil says:

    3.5 5.A novel dwelling on the loss of home and community for North Indian Muslims The text juxtaposes 1857, 1947, and 1971 against each other and against cultural memory Karbala, the death of Krishna, various apocalyptic symbology The home and spiritual community referred to by the title is a building on fire the denizens are headless This violence is dislocating the main character processes these events by blurring together past, present and cultural memory The narratives Zakir keeps re 3.5 5.A novel dwelling on the loss of home and community for North Indian Muslims The text juxtaposes 1857, 1947, and 1971 against each other and against cultural memory Karbala, the death of Krishna, various apocalyptic symbology The home and spiritual community referred to by the title is a building on fire the denizens are headless This violence is dislocating the main character processes these events by blurring together past, present and cultural memory The narratives Zakir keeps returning to are those of betrayal Home is destroyed by brothers betraying brothers what happens at the Red Fort and by the pursuit of the throne political power over the struggle of the soul jihad Overall, the text is a self critical examination of the professed goal of the Pakistani nation state the creation of a spiritual homeland for all South Asian Muslims suggesting that the project failed While innovative and evocative, I found the text slow going I will need to revisit it again It would be interesting to read this alongside Fireflies in the Mist by Hyder